A Belfast, P.E.I. Scrapbook, 1901-1912, Page 2


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Married

At the Manse, Lynn, Mass., Feb 8th, 1905, by the Rev. Arva John Marsh, Monty J. Buchanan, of Mount Buchanan, P.E.I., to Jessie R. Macleod, of Orwell, P.E.I.

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In Memorium

In memory of Alice McDonald of Crapaud, P.E. Island, died in Malden, Mass., January 6th, 1902. Aged 23 years.

In the month of sweet September
When the flowers brightly bloom
And in rainbow tints are decking
Field and forest, house and tomb.

When a vessel crossed the ocean
Sailing o'er the briny foam
Bearing Alice from her loved ones
And her quiet Island home.

She had seemed so bright and cheerful
As she left her native strand
Sailing o'er the silvery ocean
Then to roam the stranger land.

As she parted with her brothers
And her sisters fond and true
And her parents little thought they
This would be their last adieu.

Little thought they when she left them
When those fond farewells were said
E're they met she would be sleeping
With the army of the dead.

But Death ere lingers o'er us
And he laid his icy hand
On the sister who had left them
Left to roam another land.

It was at the new years dawning
That she left the earth below
Went to wear a crown in Heaven
And a robe as pure as snow.

They have laid her low in Crapaud
In a lonely mounded grave
Where the flowers bright are blooming
And the grasses o'er her wave.

She can never roam its meadows
Where the sweet blue violets grow
And they'll miss her from the cottage
Where she dwelt not long ago.

But when they shall cross the river
With the boatman cold and pale
And shall softly drop the anchor
And shall furl the snowy sail.

When they see the golder city
Where they'll dwell forever more
Then they shall see Alice waiting
On that bright eternal shore.

True, they oft will sadly mourn her
While upon this earth below
But they know she waits in Heaven
In a robe as pure as snow.

Mel Hancock

Wood Islands North, P.E.I.

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Death

 

At Glen William, Lot 63, January 4th, Mary McLeod, aged 40 years and 8 months, the dearly beloved wife of Angus J. McLeod. Great sympathy is felt for the sorrowing husband in his sore and sad bereavement who is left in charge of five young children without the tender care and affectionate touch of a mother's hand. It was truly heart rendering to see the children weeping when looking at the lifeless body of their dear mother lying in the casket about to be closed and carried out of the house to the hearse. Their big tears of sorrow would break a heart of stone. The departed has left an aged mother, five brothers and two sisters, as well as a sad husband to mourn her loss. The deceased lived a quiet humble Christian life and left this world trusting solely and entirely to the efficacious merits of the Redeemer.

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Funeral

The funeral of the late John Buchanan - mate, whose death occurred at the Cambridge City Hospital, on Nov. 21st, took place at the home of his step-mother, Mrs. Alexander Buchanan, Cambridge, Mass. Deceased was a native of Eldon, and while a mere lad chose as his occupation that of a sailor. After following the sea for twelve years, during which time he made one or more trips around the world, deceased landed in Boston a year and a half ago and worked ashore as a painter. Having a desire to go to sea again, he made a trip down south, and had returned to Boston two days previous to the tragic affair which proved fatal. He, in the company of a Mr. McFarlane, was returning home from a visit to a friend's house, when they were met by two unknown men supposed to be Italians. After a few words were exchanged a quarrel ensued in which one of the men drew a knife and inflicted desperate wounds on the body of the deceased, one over the heart, two in the abdomen, one in the pit of the stomach, one over left-breast, and several on the right arm. The two men afterwards made their escape. The deceased was then taken to McFarlane's house where he lay all night without any medical attendance, McFarlane claiming he knew not that the deceased had been stabbed. Early the next morning the ambulance was sent for, and he was taken to hospital where the doctors pronounced it a hopeless case. He bore his sufferings very patiently and never lost consciousness. All that medical skills could do was to no avail. Deceased was 29 years of age and was a son of the late Alexander Buchanan, carpenter. A delegation from the Seamen's Union of Boston, of which the deceased was a member, attended to the funeral. The body was enclosed with a broadcloth covered casket which was banked with beautiful flowers. Rev. Mr. Norcross conducted the funeral service, after which the remains were borne to the Cambridge Cemetery and laid beside those of his father. Deceased left a step-mother, five brothers and five sisters, and a large circle of friends to mourn his death.

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Death

At Surrey, Belfast, on the 19th of Oct. inst., Hugh McWilliams, in the 79th year of his age. An aged widow, five sons, and one daughter survive, who mourn the loss of one who was always affectionate and dutiful as Husband and father, together with numerous a circle of relations and friends who will ever miss him as a worthy member of their community.

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Born

At Pinette, Belfast, on May 15th, Capt. Murdoch and Mrs. Findlayson, a daughter.

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Obituary

On the 19th of October, 1903, at Surrey, Belfast, there passed peacefully away form this world to one of eternal bliss and happiness, Mr. Hugh McWilliam, at the advanced age of 79 years. Deceased was the son of the late Robert McWilliam, of Eldon who's memory we all still cherish. The deceased was one of the first settlers in Surry, when it was still a growing forest. He married Miss Katie Ross of Murray Harbour Road, known as Grandview. With much toil and hardship they made themselves a comfortable home, and raised a respectable family who survive him. Thomas, in Maine; Daniel in New Westminster, B.C.; Mrs. John T. McWilliam, Eldon; John R. in Colorado; Alexander in Maine; William on the homestead. In politics he was a life-long Liberal-Conservative. In his religious beliefs he was a true Presbyterian. For many years he was a good and consistent member of St. John's Church, Belfast.

When the hour of his departure drew near, he said to his wife, "I'm not going to get over this." He was resigned to the will of God. A large number of people attended the funeral to Belfast Church which he dearly loved, where in that beautiful cemetery his remains were laid to sleep in the dust to awake at the last trumpet's awful voice on the resurrection morn. - Com.

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Married

The home of Mrs. John S. Fraser, 48 Walden St., North Cambridge, Mass., was the scene of a pretty wedding Monday evening, Oct. 30th, 1905, when in the presence of a few intimate friends, her daughter, Nina May, was united in marriage to Mr. Russell Edgar White, Ch'town, PEI. The ceremony was performed by Rev. D. B. McLeod, M. A. pastor of the Union Square, Presbyterian Church, Somerville, Mass. The bride was charmingly gowned in white silk, while the bridesmaid Miss Maud E. Fraser, sister of the bride wore a dainty dress of sheer pink organdie. The groom was supported by Mr. Charles L. Miller of Cambridge, Mass. An elaborate breakfast was served after the ceremony. The presents were numerous and valuable, testifying to the esteem in which Mr. and Mrs. White are held. The bride and groom are natives of Prince Edward Island, and well-known in Charlottetown. Mr. and Mrs. White will reside at 86 Oxford St., Somerville, Mass. The Patriot extends hearty congratulations.

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Accidental Death

The body of the late John A. Ross who was accidentally killed in Forboro, Mass., was brought to the city last night by the special. Deceased belonged to Murray Harbour Road, and was an engineer of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railway. The body was accompanied by his wife, formerly a Miss McRae of Point Prim. S. Gotham, A. S. E. & I. Of the N. Y., N. H., & H. Railway and Miss Mary McRae brother [sic] of the deceased. The details of the accident are given in the following despatch: While endeavoring to look over the tender of his engine, John Ross, of Roxbury, and engineer on the extra Boston and Providence freight train, was killed instantly at East Foxboro this afternoon. Mr. Ross was trying to see how much water was in the tank, and was struck by the overhead bridge called "Beals" bridge. His scull was fractured. Medical examiner Bragg was absent and Medical Examiner Rolden of Attelboro was asked to view the body, but was obliged to decline, as his jurisdiction is confined to Bristol country. The engineer was about 38 years old and married. For some considerable time he was engineer at the Mansfield yard and later he ran on the Stoughton branch. About a year ago, he came near death by his engine tipping over one Sunday at a turntable in Roxbury.

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Funeral

The funeral of the late Alexander Buchanan, aged 55 years, of Cambridge, Mass., formerly of Eldon, P. E. Island was held Dec. 3rd, at his home, 39 School St., Cambridge. The body reposed in a handsome black casket, with silver mountings, and around it were banked floral offerings from Clan Malcolm and the Highland Dress Association. Delegated from Clan Malcolm, the Highland Dress Association, and the Carpenter's Union were present. Mr. Buchanan learned the carpenter trade in early life, and followed that occupation until a few days previous to his death. He was sick only about ten days. All that medical skill and loving hands could do could not save him from that dread disease eryisipelas. A widow and seven children survive him, also seven children from a former wife. Mr. Buchanan was a typical Scotchman and while on P. E. Island always took part in the Caledonia gatherings. He was familiarly known as Sandy the Piper and since he made his home in Cambridge, no Scotch picnic in the vicinity of Boston was considered complete without his presence.

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Death

On December 21st there passed away at the City Hospital, Boston, Mr. James A. Fraser, after a brief illness, of malignant cancer. Deceased was born in Imvergorden, Scotland, in 1858, and removed to Los Angeles, Cal. In 1885, where he worked as a dry goods salesman for a number of years. In 1896, he married Alice Ross, a daughter of the late Walter B. Ross, of Eldon, P.E.I., and removed to Boston, Mass. in 1899 where he followed his business till the autumn of 1904, where he was stricken with what his doctors, assisted by expert advice, recognized as locomotor ataxia. Mr. Fraser was removed to the home of his wife's brother, L. A. Ross, Eldon, where he was confined to his bed in a helpless state for two years. At the end of this time, on the advice of Dr. Carruthers of Charlottetown, he was removed to City Hospital, where after six months treatment under that skillful physician, he was restored to perfect health. About one year ago, he returned to Boston and worked at his business until about one month ago, when he passed away. He leaves to mourn, his wife and one son. His funeral was from the home of Henry Finley, 1125 Massachusets [sic] Avenue, Arlington, Mass. The many floral tributes and kind attention of friends showed the high esteem in which the deceased was help. - Com.

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Obituary

A gloom was cast over this neighbourhood when it was reported that Mary McLeod, wife of Angus J. McLeod of Glen William had died suddenly on Saturday morning, Jan. 4th. The deceased had gone to rest the night before in usual health and good cheer but at early morning death had claimed her as its victim. All that willing hands and loving hearts could do to stay the messenger of death was to no avail. It was sad indeed to see her borne to her grave with her new born baby in the same casket by her bosom. She was the daughter of the late Donald McDonald of Valleyfield and was forty years and eight months of age. She was the mother of nine children, four of whom are now dead. Being trained by pious and unassuming parents, she was noted for her winning manner and cheerful disposition and displayed the same various and exemplary conduct in the patient training of her family. She leaves a husband and five children besides and aged mother, two? [ink smeared] sister, and five? Brothers as well as a large circle of friends and acquaintances to mourn he irreparable loss.

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Notes From Eldon

A correspondent from Eldon writes that James Munro has left for Boston. Inventor McTavish has arrived home from St. John. Miss Ruth Munroe has left for Charlottetown. Donald W. McDonald intends building a large fish house at Pinnette Bridge this summer. John T. Weatherbie, Ocean View paid Roseberry a flying visit recently.

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Death

The death took place on June 13th at the residence of her aunt, Mrs. Wm. McWilliams, Eldon, Belfast, of Emily Jane, wife of Arthur T. McMann, of St. John, N.B., aged 24 years. Her death occurred while she was visiting her aunt, where she had come with the hope that her health would improve.

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Westward Ho!

Three young men, Messrs Angus M. Bruce, of Ocean View; John McSwain, Flat River; and John W. McLeod, are in town today, en route for the West. They will go in the company of Mr. Daniel McWilliams, of B.C., who has been on the Island visiting his old home during the winter. We wish the exodians every success in the Pacific Province. - Patrriot.

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Funeral

At Point Prim, the remains of Jessie McRae, wife of the late Michael McLeod, ex light house keeper at Point Prim were laid to rest beside her husband at Mt. Buchanan burying ground. She passed away at midnight, March 31st at the age of 80 years. Up to a few days of her death she led a very healthy and God fearing life and was much respected by all who knew her. She leaves to mourn, two sons, Samuel on the homestead, and Murdock in East Boston; four daughters, Mrs. J. W. Steward, Waltham, Mass; Mrs. William Peach, Marblehead, Mass.; Mrs. Charles Burton, Ensfield, Mass.; and Mrs. John A. Stewart at Point Prim and 28 grand children. One brother, Archd. McRae at Point Prim, and one sister, Mrs. Angus Nicholson, at Orwell also survive her. She was born and lived all her life at Point Prim, and will be missed by all who knew her.

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Died

At the City Hospital, Boston, June 9, where she had undergone an operation for peritonitis, Ida Longard, aged 29 years, beloved wife of William Lantz and daughter of Robert Longard of Eldon, P. E. Island, departed from earth. Death came to her in early womanhood, but it found her ready. She had no fears. She has been for years a true believer in Jesus Christ and had lived a beautiful life. She was faithful in all the relations of life and daughter, wife, mother, and friend, was thoughtful, gentle, and loving. Her sympathy with all who were in trouble was deep, and as far as was in her power she ministered to their needs. At the time of her death, her husband was confined at home by severe illness and was not able to go to see her. Strange to say she in a dream of vision a few months before her departure went back and bade him and the children a loving farewell and he in his sleep felt that she was with him at the same hour. She had been planning a visit for the summer to the old homestead at Eldon. Instead of this, she has gone to be with Jesus in the heavenly Father's mansions where there shall be perfect bliss forever. She will be greatly missed here but our loss is her gain. The prayer is that all who knew and loved her might know and love and follow her Saviour and find an eternal home with all of the redeemed. Her body was brought home. Funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Sunday afternoon, June 14th, when a large company gathered to pay their last tribute of respect. May God comfort the bereaved.

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Married

McDonald-McDonald - On April 27, 1910, by Rev. A. S. Stewart, at the manse, Valleyfield, Peter W. McDonald, Heatherdale, to Jessie McDonald, of Whim Road Cross.

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Death

There passed peacefully to her eternal rest with the assured hope of a glorious resurrection on December 8th inst. In her eighty seventh year at the home of her son in law Chas. J. McWilliams of Eldon, Flora Nicholson, relict of the late Alexander McSwain. She was of a quiet and unassuming disposition and possessed of qualities that gained for her the respect and esteem of all her acquaintances. During her lifetime an inscrutable Providence laid upon her sorrows more bitter than falls to the lot of but a few. She was called upon to mourn the death of a husband, four sons one of whom was Dr. McSwain, well known in this Province, and two daughters in which affliction her implicit faith in an all wise creator enabled her to bow beneath the rod and say, "Thy will be done." She leaves to mourn one son, Samuel of Boston, and two daughters, Mary Anne, wife of Mr. N. McLeod of Vancouver, B.C., and Katie, wife of Chas. J. McWilliams with whom she lived.

A noble life but written not in any book of fame;
Among the list of noted ones None ever saw her name;
For only her own household knew the victories she had won;
And none but they could testify How well her work was done.

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Wedding

Thanksgiving night, after the good old custom, Samuel A. Murchison and Miss Catherine McLeod were united in marriage in the home of Hugh Gillis, 46 Albertina Street, by the Rev. W. B. Barr. The bridesmaid was Miss Margaret Murchison, a sister of the groom, and the best man was Simon Stewart, a nephew of the groom. The bride was beautifully gowned in a white Persian lawn trimmed with lace; she wore a bridal veil, and carried a bouquet of white carnations. The bridesmaid was dressed in white lawn trimmed with all overlace and carried a bouquet of pinks. After the ceremony a supper was served. There were about forty guests present from Boston, Cambridge, Milford, North Arblington, Wollaston, and the west. Mr. and Mrs. Murchison received many beautiful ornamental and useful presents. The supper was served on the second floor in their own apartments which are already furnished for housekeeping. These are two of our popular young people and their numerous friends extend their congratulations. - Quincy Herald.

[Mr. Murchison is the son of the late Capt. Donald M. Murchison of Point Prim, and his bride is also of the same place, being the second daughter of the late John N. McLeod. Their many friends in P. E. Island join in wishing them many years of happiness.]

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Wedding

At the home of the bride, Tuesday, April 2nd, a quiet but very pretty wedding was solemnized when Miss Ethel Eva Carrier youngest daughter of Mr. Stephen Carrier, Earnscliffe and Mr. John D. Gillis of Johannesburg, South Africa were united in holy wedlock by Rev. Jas. Simpson of St. Peter's Cathedral, Charlottetown. The bride was becomingly attired in grey and was attended by her sister, Miss Kathie B. while the groom was supported by Mr. R. McKenzie, Flat River. Only the immediate relatives of the bride and bridegroom were present. The bride received many valuable presents and among them was a cheque for one thousand dollars from Mr. Angus Gillis, brother of the groom. Mr. and Mrs. Gillis intend leaving in the near future for their home in South Africa.

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Obituary

Annie, the beloved wife of John R. McWilliams, and only daughter of Donald Gillis, Garfield, died on the 12th Oct., aged 37 years. Her parents now in the infirmity of old age and illness, have great reason to mourn the loss of a dutiful and affectionate daughter. Three brothers also survive, but the main cause for sorrow is to the bereaved husband, and young son, who are thus deprived of a faithfully loving wife, and a warm hearted mother when but in the prime of her life yet they cherish the bright hope that their loss is her eternal gain; and they moreover take this opportunity to express their sincere gratitude to the numerous friends, neighbours, and acquaintances throughout the Parish of Belfast and adjoining districts, who so nobly turned out on the day of her funeral to pay the last tribute of love and honour to the deceased, whom they all well esteemed when living. The funeral service was solemnly and appropriately discoursed by Rev. S. D. McPhee after which the remains were followed to their last resting place in Belfast Cemetery by a vast number of sorrowing friends.

Thou art gone, thou gentle fair one, In early youth and bloom,
Why silver stream of life has run To last lone silent tomb.
A Joy from birth, a gift on earth, Such unto parents given,
God knows what's best, You are called to rest,
Enjoy the joys of Heaven.

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Death

Yesterday's Guardian contained a portrait of the late Frank Beer McQuarrie who was drowned last year in the ill-fated steamer Dix, which was sunk on Port Blakely, on Puget Sound. Herewith is a copy of a letter sent to the deceased parents, D. S. and Mrs. McQuarrie, Crapaud by one of the proprietors of the firm with whom their son was employed at the time of his death: "I have started to write you several times since the terrible disaster of last Sunday night, in which you lost your son, and I, a friend, and valuable assistant. Frank has been working in the office, in my department, for nearly two and a half years, and was one of the brightest boys I have ever seen, and his advance in the Company would doubtless have been rapid. It was only a few days ago that the general manager and I were talking of giving him another advance. I can hardly realize he is gone, and every time the office door opens I look up expecting to se him. Every effort is being made to recover the bodies, and by Sunday, there will be launches on every part of the Sound searching for them. Frank's desk and chair have been draped in mourning, and his effects are being taken care of by Oliver and Mrs. Myers. I offer you my deepest sympathy and trust that God will give you the strength to met your sorrows, and such comfort as only He can give you."

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Death

A deep gloom was cast over the home of Neil and Mrs. McPherson, Newton Cross, when on Dec. 7, 1906, the angel of death summoned their darling little Mary Florence and infant aged 2 weeks and 4 days. The grief stricken parents have the sympathy of a very large community in their bereavement. It is hard to part with one so precious but their love is their loved one's gain, and if there can be a compensating thought, it is that their darling has returned to God. Who gave it pure and unspotted by the world's temptations. The services at the home, and the Cemetery were conducted by Re. S. A. McPhee, Pastor of St. John's Church, Belfast, and were most comforting and impressive. Not withstanding the inclemency of the weather the funeral at the service at the Belfast Cemetery was largely attended. - Com.

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Death

McWILLIAMS - At Eldon, March 25th, 1906, of measles, Chester, only and dearly beloved son of Alexander and Isabell McWilliams, aged 3 months and 23 days.

This lovely bud so young and fair Called hence by early doom,
Just came to show how sweet a flower, In paradise could bloom.
Ere sin could harm or sorrow fade, Death came with friendly care,
The opening bud to Heaven conveyed, And bade its blossom there.

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Concert

The Morning Star Mission band of Newton held their Christmas Tree and entertainment on Monday night, December 26th at the home of their president, Ella McTavish. The program was as follows: Instrumental Duett [sic], D. Smith and Ella McTavish; Recitation, Ella McTavish; Reading, Edythe McDougall; Instrumental Music, Marion Smith and S. McTavish; Recitation, Winnie McDougall; Vocal Duet, Fred Smith and Ella McTavish; Reading, J. McTavish; Instrumental music, R. Buchanan; Recitation, Katie Smith and Marion McDougall; Instrumental music, Susanna Buxton; Reading, Arlene Finlayson; Recitation, Tillie McLellan. After this programme, Santa Claus appeared and gladdened every heart by distributing numerous presents off a well-laden tree. Refreshments were served after which the event closed by singing God Save the King. All went home well pleased, wishing Christmas would come more than once a year.

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Death

There passed away recently at Eldon, Jessie, daughter of the late John Findlayson, in the 58th year fo her age. She removed to Boston at the early age of sixteen, and remained there until a year before her death. She was a faithful member of the Methodist People's Temple for twenty years. She leaves to mourn three sisters, Mary and Margaret at home, and Mrs. Stephen Carrier in Earnscliffe, and one brother, John in Truro, besides a large number of relatives and friends. Her funeral took place to Pt. Prim Cemetery, the services conducted by Rev. S. D. McPhee. The pallbearers were Robert Longard, M. F. McDonald, J. N. Gillis, Wm. Finlayson, Everett McAulay, N. A. Gillis.

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Funeral

The funeral of Miss Mina Finlayson, daughter of Malcolm and Isabella Finlayson of Eldon, took place Saturday afternoon to St. John's cemetery , Belfast. There was a very large attendance indeed. The young lady was but in her twentieth year. She was the teacher of the Eldon school, and was only ill for 3 days, gastritis being the complaint. The sad event has evoked very great sympathy on all sides.

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Death

Entered into rest at Pinette, on Monday, Feby, the 25th, 1901, Mary Bella, beloved wife of Samuel McWilliam and the eldest daughter of William Stewart, in the 37th year, leaving a sorrowing husband and three young children to mourn their great loss.

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Death

At Eldon, May 21st, 1902, Richard S. Robertson, aged 65 years. Leaving a widow, four sons and three daughters to mourn their loss.

Dearest father, thou hast left us, And our loss we greatly feel;
But 'tis God who has bereft us, He can all our sorrows heal.
Yet again we hope to meet thee, When the day of life is fled,
And in Heaven with joy to greet thee, Where no farewell tears are shed.

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Died

At San Francisco, Cal., on September 8th, a902, Alexander McDOnald, aged 34 years, son of the late Donald McDonald, Valleyfield West. He leaves four brothers, Daniel, Duncan, John, Peter, and two sisters, Lizzie, and Mrs. Malcolm D. McLeod, Valleyfield West, and the late Angus McLeod, Glen William, Lot 63.

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Died

On the 20th of January, 1904, at Marquette Hospital, Mich., U. S. A., eight days after undergoing a surgical operation, Thomas McWIlliams, eldest son of the late Hugh McWilliams of Surrey, Belfast, aged 47 years and several months. He lived in the state of Michigan for several years, and was a young man of good reputation and well known.

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Died

At Glen William, Lot 63, after a lingering illness, E. Maynard, beloved child of Mary and Angus J. McLeod, aged 6 years, 9 months, and 9 days.

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Died

At Portage, Belfast, on Nov. 7th, Mary daghter of E. C. and Latie McLean, in the twelfth year of her age.

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New Lodge

A new Lodge of the Independent Order of Good Templers was organized at Mt. Buchanan, by Bro. Richard Creed of Albion, with the membership of twenty-two. This Lodge shall be known as Maple Leaf No. 1. The following officers were duly elected: Charles D. McLeod, Lodge Deputy; Neil A. McLeod, C. T.; Wm. Kennedy, R. C. T.; Mary B. McLeod, V. T.; John N. Gillis, Sec'y; Dollia A. Gillis, Fin. Sec'y; Allan McAuley, Treas.; Florence Stewart, Chap.; Donald McKinnon, Marshall; Murdock Gillis, D. Marshall; Douglas Buchanan, Guard; Everett McAulay, Sent.

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Marriage

MOORE-McKENZIE - At the residence of the bride's father, James St. C. Moore, Eldon, Jan 8, 1908, by the Rev. S. D. McPhee, Edith Alexandra Moore to David Wallace McKenzie, M. D., of New York.

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Wedding

A pretty wedding was solemnized at the home of James St. C. Moore, Eldon, on Wednesday morning, when his daughter, Miss Edith A. Moore was united in marriage to Dr. David W. McKenzie, of New York. The ceremony, which was performed by Rev. S. D. McPhee was a very quiet affair, the bride and groom being unnattended.

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Departure

Dr. David W. McKenzie and bride, nee Moore of Eldon, left by last night's express for Georgetown en route to their home in New York.

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Married

McKenzie-McWilliams - At the home of the bride, Eldon, Belfast, Wm. D. McKenzie and Margaret A. McWilliams. The former from Flat River. Rev. J. W. McKenzie, officiating.

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Died

McAuley - At Sydney, N.S., May 31st, Florence L., beloved wife of the late Angus A. MacAuley, in the 26th year of her age.

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Marriage

He marriage took place on Jany 20 at the home of the bride, Flat River, of Miss Annie Ross, daughter of the late William Ross to Wellington Compton, also of Flat River. The ceremony was conducted by the Rev. A. McLean Sinclair. The bride, who was prettily attired in cream cashmere with white applique trimmings, was given away by her brother, A. M. Ross, of Murray River. Miss Margaret Furness, of Vernon River, cousin of the bride, was bridesmaid, while the groom was supported by his brother, Lemuel Compton. A few of the immediate friends of the contracting parties were present to witness the ceremony. The presents were both numerous and useful. Their many friends join in wishing the happy couple bon voyage.

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Visit

A. A. McWilliam, Boston, who has been visiting his old home in Eldon, leaves on return this morning. He came to the city yesterday, and registered at the Queen Hotel.

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Died

At. Cambridge, Mass., on January 31st, 1906, after an illness of two weeks of pneumonia, Samuel McSwain, formerly of Belfast, P. E. Island, aged 61 years. He leaves a family of three sons and two daughters; besides two sisters, Mrs. Norman McLeod of Vancouver, and Mrs. C. J. McWilliam, Eldon.

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News from Eldon

A correspondent from Eldon writes that Baxter Hubley has sold his cow for a handsome sum. John A. McMillan has removed from Garfield to Pinette, where he intends in future residing. James Munroe leaves in a few days for Boston. Donald W. McDonald paid Pinette a flying visit a few days ago. F. W. Panton has secured the contract of mail driving from Surrey Station to Roseberry. It is hoped Mr. Panton will give a good service. Inventor McTavish is visiting in Garfield, the guest of friends.

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Foxes

The foxes are yet abundant in this Province was recently shown when William J. Gillis and John S. McLeod, both of Orwell Cove, captured in the short time of one hour, thirteen of these animals. The lucky hunters sold their capture to a certain party in Montague for a handsome sum. Who says thirteen is an unlucky number?

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In Memorian [sic]

(Written by his nephew)

To the loving memory of our uncle, Daniel Edmonds, who died on February 22nd, in his sixty-seventh year after a lingering illness. His one wish gratified, that when the "end" would come that he might "breath his last" under the roof of his dearest friends, - the home of Peter and Mrs. Curran, Summerville, P. E. Island. How hard that message struck, and how we have longed to have been at home with our "loved ones" through the trying ordeal. There is, however, a higher source of comfort that earthly consolation, and let us hope he is far happier. - Misses Mary and Annie Curran, Providence, R. I.

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Unusual Catch

Charles Lutz, fisherman at Gillis & Son's lobster factory at Flat River, captured a very large lobster weighing 13 lbs. and measuring 21 inches from tip of claws. Beat this, who can.

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In Memoriam

In loving memory of Mrs. John Campbell who passed away at her home in Bonshaw, May 3, 1909.

One year has passed, pure hearts still sore
As time flies by we miss her more
Her loving voice, her welcome face,
No more can fill the vacant place,
Forget her, No! We never will,

We loved her then, we love her still
Her memory is as fresh today
As in the day she passed away.

News from Orwell Cove

An Orwell Cove Correspondent writes: Farmers in this vicinity are busily engaged in cutting and hauling their spring's supply of longers and summer wood. All are pleased to see the well known painter, Amos McLeod out again after his recent attack of la grippe. William Cook has finished his contract of sawing wood for William Dreelan. Mr. Cook reports that his engine gave good satisfaction. Joe Nicholson purchased a Clydesdale mare recently. Mr. Nicholson insists there is money in horse-raising and intends going into the business in a large scale. Miss Mary Inman of Grandview spent Easter holidays with friends in Orwell Cove. John A. McLeod and William J. Gillis crossed Orwell Bay with their sailboat, North Star, on March 28th, which is a clear sign of an early spring. Arthur Gillis is busily engaged in getting material for a large coach house which he intends erecting during the coming summer. John M. Gillis paid a visit to Dundee recently and reported the roads in a very bad condition. Duncan McDonald has launched his sailboat, Kingfisher, after giving it a thorough overhauling. John McLeod has returned home from a visit to friends in Mt. Buchanan. Ernest McLeod, merchant, has returned home from Charlottetown. Miss Mary McDonald has returned home after a lengthy visit with John C. and Mrs. McLeod, Lyndale. Sinclair McDonald has returned to Charlottetown to resume his studies in Prince of Wales College.

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From the Pictou Advocate

The Pictopu Advocate says, "We had a visit this week from Rev. A. McLean Sinclair of Hopewell, Rev. Mr. McLean lectures on Gaelic in Dalhousie and St. Frances Xavier Universities and is a great Gaelic Scholar. He gave us a short talk on Comparative Philology, so interesting that we regretted that the reverend gentleman had not been at Dalhousie at the time of our sojourn there. He informed us that he used to edit a Gaelic column for the Pictou News when the late Charles MacDonald was editor of that paper. He is an alumnus of Pictou Academy and went to the old Academy, the Church St. building, in the days when Jack and Costley were the professors. Costley taught classics and mathematics and was an excellent teacher, according to Mr. Sinclair. Fellow students of our visitor at the old college were Dr. Gordon, of Queen's University, his brother, the late Joseph Gorden and the late Fred Fraser, druggist.

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Untitled

Among those who were the first to shake the hand of the Rev. M. J. McLeod, formerly of Belfast, P. E. I., at the recent installation of that divine as new pastor of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in New York, was Alex McLeod, the well known artist, also a native of Belfast.

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Transferred

A. G. Putnam, the efficient manager of the Royal Bank, Sackville, N.B., has been transferred to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Mrs. Putnam remains during the summer at her old home, Belfast, P. E. I., joining her husband later. A branch bank is to be opened at Prince Albert of which Mr. Putnam will be the first manager. He is a grandson of the late J. K. Blair, of homoured memory in Truro. The old home of the late Stephen Putnam, Maitland, is now closed up, and nearly all the family, including Mrs. Putnam, are in the North West. - Truro News. - Mr. and Mrs. Putnam arrived in this city last night. They will remain in town with friends for a short time. Shortly before leaving Sackville, Mrs. Putnam was the recipient of an address and a pretty gift of remembrance from the ladies aid of the Presbyterian Church.

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Untitled

Rev. Dr. Malcolm McLeod has commenced his work in the congregation of the Collegiate Church, St. Nicholas, N.Y. After filling his pulpit in during the month of May, he will enter upon the long vacation granted by his congregation. A part of his furlough will be spent at his old home, Belfast, P.E.I. The contributions of the church of which the Rev. Dr. is now pastor, last year to various philanthropic and charitable objects were over $50.000.

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In Loving Memory

The following lines were written by Margaret Muirhead, 9 Vincen Avenue, Waverly, Mass. on receiving the news of her mother's death, Mrs. Wm. MacPherson, Bellevue, P. E. I., who died Tuesday, M<arch 29th, 1910.

My mother gone, My God, oh can it be
That I shall never, never, never see my mother dear
That thrilling soothing voice, that fond embrace
That tender look, that sweet, love-radiant face!
My mother dear! When I shall home, forward face
Oh, who shall welcome me, thy wayward care!
Returning hence, when I shall homeward face
How shall, O pitying God, how can I bear
Approach my childhood home and she not there.

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News From Point Prim

A correspondent writes from Point Prim as follows: The farmers of this community are busily engaged in hauling their winter firewood. The young people of Point Prim took advantage of the good skating on Monday night and spent an enjoyable evening. A very enjoyable evening was spent recently at the home of John A. and Mrs. McRae. Games and music were indulged in after which a bounteous supper was served by Mrs. McRae. A meeting was held in the Point Prim school house last week for the purpose of discussing daily mail to Mt. Buchanan and Point Prim. At the close of the meting a vote of thanks was tendered to chairman, Ronald McRae. The up to date farmer, John C. McDonald has returned to Point Prim from a visit to Charlottetown. Samuel McLean is visiting in Mt. Buchanan, the guest of John McKinon. R. D. McRae has purchased a valuable driving sleigh from J. J. Larabee, Eldon. J. Jardine, lobster packer, Crown Point, has been in Point Prim recently engaging fishermen for the coming season. Angus McDonald has finished his contract of building a wood-sleigh for Donald McLean. Charles Malay met with a painful accident by falling on the ice and causing the action of the heart to stop for a few minutes. His many friends are pleased to learn that he is improving, under skillful management. Point Prim School is progressing under the skillful direction of Miss Sadie Smith.

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Born

HERMANN - At Wilkie, Sask., on March 5th, 1912 to J. P. and Mrs. Hermann, (nee Pearl Carver, Pownal), a son, Louis Morton. Congratulations.

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News From Flat River

A Flat River correspondent writes: The thaw of last week has taken away all the snow and the roads are in very bad condition. J. J. England, Springfield has returned home after visiting friends in Flat River. Compton and Ross, contractors are busily engaged getting ready for their summer's work. Jack Gillis and Samuel Ross are cutting their summer's supply of wood. Mrs. D. Campbell, Southport, is visiting friends in Flat River. Edward Beaton is busily engaged building a fishing boat. He will have it fitted with an Imperial engine. Mrs. D. McLeod, Melleville, has returned home. While here, she was the guest of Mrs. D. E. Ross. John R. Ross is busy packing his summers supply of ice, assisted by D. W. Ross. Mrs. A. N. McDonald, Flat River, and Miss D. Gillis, Pt. Prim, spent Sunday last in Murray River, the guest of Dr. and Mrs. Berhoe.

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News from Pownal

A Pownal correspondent writes: Wm. Jenkins, Lillview, and Wm. Mutch, Cherry Valley, paid Pownal a flying visit recently. The many friends of Gurney Campbell, Pownal, are glad to see him out again after his recent severe illness. Miss Clara Carver, Hazelbrook, is visiting friends in Montague. Angus Bell, Belle River, is visiting in Pownal. Miss Lizzie Pratt, Pownal, is at present visiting at Southport. Vernon Gay, Charlottetown, has arrived home after a pleasant visit in Montague, the guest of Mrs. S. B. Mellish. Wellington McNeill, Pownal, has returned home after visiting Montague.

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News from Millview

A Millview writer says: The many friends of Mrs. Robert Wood, Millview, are glad to learn she is improving nicely after her serious illness. Vernon Jenkins, Millview, has returned home after a pleasant visit with friends in Vernon River. Miss Annie Parkin, Vernon River, spent Sunday with her friend, Miss Lavenia Acorn. Wm. H. Masters, Vernon River, was a visitor in Hazelbrook recently.

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Funeral

The funeral of the late Jennie Martin, sister of K. J. Martin, Stipendiary Magistrate of Charlottetown, took place Wednesday afternoon and was largely attended. The remains were taken from the homestead where her mother, sister, and brother reside, to the Belfast Presbyterian Cemetery, where services were conducted by Rev. A. J. McNeill. The pallbearers were: Judge McDonald, D. R. Morrison, Peter McQueen, Charles A. McKenzie, D. A. Martin, William McLaren.

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Address and Presentation

On the evening of February the sixteenth, a surprise party called at the home of Wm. Coady of Millview, and a few very pleasant hours were spent. A beautiful hall lamp was presented with the following address, Dear Friends: To show the pleasure entertained and to congratulate you on your recent removal into this new, fine, and commodious dwelling house, this party, which is certainly a surprise to you, have called upon you this evening.

During the few years that you have lived in the district of Millview, by your neighbourly qualities, you have won the affection of all and by your energetic labours have reached the goal of success.

It is with the very best wished of your many acquaintances as well as of those who are present this evening that your success in the future will be as bright as that of the past, and that you may be spared many years to enjoy your new home.

Please accept this present as a token of esteem and as a remembrance of this enjoyable evening on which this party came to visit you. Signed on behalf of the party.

To both address and presentation Mr. Coady made a very suitable reply.

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Marriage

The marriage of Miss Annie Gertrude Tweedy, daughter of the late Joseph Tweedy, of Earnscliffe, to John Furness Hayden, of Vernon River, took place at the home of the bride, on Wednesday noon, Feb 28th. A large number of the relatives and friends of the contracting parties were present, the parlor where Rev. Mr. Orman performed the ceremony being beautifully and artistically decorated for the occasion. The bride was given away by her brother, John Tweedy, and the wedding march was played by that accomplished organist, Mrs. J. C. Irving. After the bride and the groom had received the sincere congratulations of all present, a sumptuous wedding feast was served. In the evening, after the guests had enjoyed a most thoroughly enjoyable afternoon, and had concluded the happy time by the singing of Auld Lang Syne, Mr. and Mrs. Hayden departed for their home in Vernon River, and accompanied by the hearty good wishes of their many, many friends. As testified by the large number of costly and useful presents the bride is one of the most popular and estimable young ladies of this little Province that can proudly boast of producing the smartest and best girls in the whole Dominion; while the groom is one of the Province's noblest young [? - clipping cut off unevenly] citizens.

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Untitled

The many friends of Dr. David W. McKenzie, New York, formerly of Flat River, P. E. Island will be pleased to know that he has been appointed adj. Attending surgeon, Bellevue Hospital, and chief of the surgical clinic, put patient department. He also has been promoted at Cornell Medical College, New York City, from assistant instructor of third year students to instructor of the fourth year students.

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Dairy

John D. McRae, Pinette, opened the Federal Dairying Company's factory Monday with better prospects than ever before, there being more milk on opening day. With the present high prices for butter, farmers should feel encouraged to patronize their own dairies more largely than in the past. Mr. McRae has the success and experience of years and is a thoroughly practical manager.

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In Memoriam

At Belle River, on May 1th, 1910, there passed away from this life, trusting in the merits of his Saviour, Daniel A. Stewart, dearly beloved son of Alex A. and Mrs. Stewart, aged 21 years. He leaves his sorrowing parents, three brothers and three sisters to mourn his loss. He had been away in Montana, but returned home, some time ago, sick. All that medical skill and good nursing could do was done for him, but he continued to sink under his disease. During his illness, he exercised great patience and was reconciled to his Heavenly Father's will. The deceased was of a calm, peaceful disposition and a favorite with all who knew him. His funeral took place on Friday afternoon, May 13th, in the presence of a large number of people. The service at the house was conducted by his pastor, Rev. D. Mackenzie, after which the procession moved on to Belfast Cemetery, where the remains were interred. The pallbearers were Alex Campbell, John A. Gillis, Ronald McIntosh, Joseph Campbell,, Magnus Ross, and Angus N. Bell. The heart felt sympathy of very many go out to the family in their sore bereavement.

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Untitled

The Rev. L. Beaton, formerly of Moose Creek, Ontario, was inducted into the Presbyterian Church at Caledonia, on Tuesday, May 31st, at 2 o'clock p. m. by the Presbytery of Prince Edward Island. Rev. D. Wright, Montague, preached; Rev. M. N. McLeod, Dundas addressed the minister; and the Rev. D. B. McLeod, Orwell, the people. Short addresses of welcome were given by Rev. A. S. Stewart, Valleyfield, Rev. D. Mackenzie, Wood Islands, and Rev. Andrew Gray, Murray Harbour N., Mr. McPherson, Elder, and Rev. Mr. Mackenzie introduced the newly inducted minister to the people at the church door as they passed out.

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Will of Late Mrs. E. Roberson

The will of the late Mrs. Edward Roberson has been probated and, as a glance at the following list of legacies will prove, quite a valuable estate was left by the deceased.

The different bequests are briefly as follows:

To daughter, Lucy J. (in addition to provision made for her under her father's will) the annual interest and dividends on twenty five shares in the Union Bank of Halifax for life. The sum of $3,160.00 and upwards on deposit in the Canadian Bank of Commerce also becomes hers absolutely.

To brother, Thomas Bulpet, of Roseneath, P.E.I., $800.00.

To the three sons of Capt. Alex Cameron, City, Hilton, Stanley, and Harry, $50.00 each, to be applied to their education.

To St. John's Presbyterian Church, Belfast, to be used for a memorial window for the Robertson family, $250.00.

To the Trustees and Minister of the Presbyterian Church, Belfast, in trust, the sum of $50.00, the interest on which sum is to be used in keeping the grass cut on the Robertson plot, in perpetuity.

To the Trustees of St. James Presbyterian Church, Charlottetown, the sum of $500.00, towards an endowment fund for said church, to be known as "The Roberson Fund", and that the annual interest thereon to be used for general church purposes.

To the P. E. Island Hospital, Charlottetown, the sum of $500.00, for an endowment fund for the said institution.

To the Late Dr. Roberson's North West (of Canada) Presbyterian Mission Fund, the sum of $500.00.

To Foreign Mission, in connection with the Presbyterian Church of Canada, the sum of $500.00.

To the Home Mission Fund, of the Presbyterian Church of Canada, the sum of five hundred dollars.

To the Women's Foreign Mission Fund, in connection with the Presbyterian Church of Canada, the sum of two hundred dollars.

To the British and Foreign Bible Society, the sum of five hundred dollars.

To the Young Men's Christian Association, Charlottetown, the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars.

To niece Ella Campbell, wife of R. H. Campbell, of Charlottetown, Teacher, the sum of four hundred dollars.

To George Kerry, of London, England, the sum of 20 sterling each.

To George Kerry's three sisters, 10 sterling each.

To each of the executors under the will as hereafter named, the sum of two hundred dollars in lieu of commission.

To housekeeper, Jane Small, the sum of one hundred dollars.

To the trustees of St. John's Presbyterian Church, Belfast, the sum of two hundred dollars to be used for general church purposes.

In the event of there not being sufficient funds to pay all the foregoing legacies, it is provided by the will that each legacy shall bear a pro rata reduction.

The residue (if any) of the estate remaining after paying all the legacies, funeral, and testamentary expenses, etc. is to be divided into two equal parts. One of these parts goes to the P. E. Island Hospital, and the balance is to be held in trust, pending a Home for Aged Protestant Women, when the amount, with interest, is to be turned over to the trustees or managing body of said institution, subject, of course, to the establishment of the institution upon a satisfactory basis.

The executors under the will are Silas Hodgson, and Capt. Alex. Cameron, both of Charlottetown.

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Well Done, Belfast

Mrs. William Buchanan of Belfast, P. E. I. Presented her husband with a beautiful baby boy last week. But, when it is related that seventeen little babies have come to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Buchanan, it is a very wonderful and happy event, indeed. Fourteen of the children are living, one daughter being married.

Mr. Buchanan is the caretaker of the Belfast Presbyterian Church. Congratulations are in order. The Guardian wishes Mr. and Mrs. Buchanan much happiness with their interesting family circle of children.

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Death

Many friends will hear with regret of the death of Donald W. Martin of Brackley Point Road, which occurred yesterday morning in the P. E. I. Hospital, where he has been since M?? [May, March?] last, after an illness of five years. Mr. Martin was the son of Mr. Alex Martin of Brackley Point, who now resides in Eldon. Besides his aged mother, there are the following to mourn their brother's demise: Dr. John T. Martin, Eldon; Duncan H. in British Columbia; Helen, in Eldon; Georgie, wife of Peter McCallum, Malpeque Road; and Ambrosine, wife of A. McKinnon, City, all of whom have the sympathy of a large circle of relatives and friends.

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Married

McPHERSON-BEER - At the home of the bride at Montague, on Wednesday the nineteenth inst., by Rev. David Nathaniel Wright, Miss Winnifred Beer to Daniel McPherson.

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Married

CLARK-GILLIS - At the residence of the bride's father, John Gillis, Flat River, on the 28th inst., by Rev. S. D. McPhee, John A. Clark, Quincy, Mass. to Christina A. Gillis, Flat River.

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Married

STEWART-McPHERSON - On Oct 27th, 1090, at the residence of the bride's father, Valleyfield, by the Rev. A. S. Stewart, Angus A. Stewart, High Bank to Christena McPherson of Valleyfield.

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Married

McLEOD-McLEOD - At the residence of A. D. McLeod, Kinross, on Oct 20th, 1909, by Rev. S. D. McPhee, cousin of the groom, Rev. D. B. McLeod, M.A., and Miss Mary Jane McLeod, both of Orwell. No Cards.

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Death

Munn - At Weston, Mass., April 2nd, 1909, there passed away Jennie May Munn, aged 11 years, only daughter of Magnus and Mrs. Munn. She died trusting in Jesus. The remains will be sent to Wood Islands for burial alongside her little brother and sister.

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Death

Much sympathy is felt for Charles and Mrs. McDonald, Garfield, in the death of their daughter Annette, which occurred from Pneumonia on Nov. 13th. Miss McDonald was much beloved and her funeral largely attended, Rev. S. D. McPhee, conducting the services. The Pallbearers were: Danl McDonald, John F. McDonald, Alex Ross, Danl Falconer, J. McLeod, and James Ross.

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Death

There passed away at Eldon on Dec. 3rd, 1909, after a lingering illness of several months, Miss Jessie McEachern, in the 42nd year of her life. The deceased, who was the daughter of late Neil J. McEachern, was of a quiet and unassuming nature, always thoughtful of others, and her loss will be deeply felt in the home circle. She leaves to mourn one brother, Hugh, and two sisters, Margaret, and Mrs. Geo. Turner, of Eldon.

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Death

NICHOLSON - At Cobalt, of typhoid fever, Samuel Angus Nicholson, son of the late Hon. James Nicholson, of Eldon, aged 40 years. Funeral from his late residence, Eldon on [clipping cut off].

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Born

NICHOLSON - At Orwell Cove, Dec 16, 1909, to Albert and Mrs. Nicholson, a daughter.

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Marriage

On the 28th of July, 1909, Nelson Cantello of Mount Buchanan and Priscilla Stewart, daughter of Donald A. Stewart of the same place were united in marriage at Watermere by the Rev. Daniel MacLean. The groom was supported by Donald MacKinnon, and the bride was attended by Miss M. Isabell MacLeod. Immediately after the ceremony, the happy couple started for their future home followed by the best wishes of a large circle of friends and acquaintances. As the young couple are very popular in the community in which they have resided all their lives. The Guardian tends its congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Cantello wishing them a prosperous journey through life.

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Married

McWILLIAMS-BUCHANNAN - at the Manse, Belfast, on the 15th inst, by Rev. S. D. McPhee, Charles Williams of Eldon to Margaret Buchannan of Pinette.

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Marriage

McDONALD-McKENZIE - At King Edward Hotel, Charlottetown, June 20th, by Rev. Harry S. F [rest of surname cut off] assisted by the Rev. Geo. Le [rest of surname cut off], Donald A. McDonald of Eldon, and Mrs. Mary J. McKenzie, Earnscliffe.

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Death

It is with great and widespread regret that the news of the untimely death of Miss Bessie Stewart, daughter of T. A. and Mrs. Stewart, of this city and West River, was received. The young lady who had a bright and prosperous future before her was well known in this city. She trained as a nurse in Prince Edward Island Hospital from which as she was compelled to withdraw owing to ill health. On regaining her strength, she went to Dr. Grey's private hospital, Lynne, Mass., from which she graduated with distinction. After a brief sojourn at her home in West River, she went on the advice of her doctor to the Southern States where, after a short stay with her aunt [?], she accepted a position as Matron of one of the principal hospitals. Here she gave the greatest satisfaction and was beloved by patients and officials alike. Owing to the great strain of the work, she accepted a position which was offered to her as matron of the National Soldier's Home at Hampton, New Port News where the work was not so heavy. Here also she was very much liked by everybody. Outside of the Hospital she was very much beloved by a large circle of friends who deeply mourn their loss. In church and kindred work she took a very deep interest and active part. Her presence will be sadly missed in the church and community. It was her intention to come home in May in order to prepare for her marriage which was to take place soon thereafter. Unfortunately she was seized with a sudden and severe illness on Monday the 6th day of January and not with standing the best medical advise available she continued to grow worse and passed away on Thursday the 10th. Her eldest sister, Miss Edith was with her to the last. Mrs. Stewart who left here on receipt of a telegram announcing her illness arrived too late to see her daughter alive. In the demise of Miss Stewart a bright, happy, and promising career has been cut short. She was a beautiful character and is now at rest. Her death was truly not leaving home, but going home to be at peace forever. Living in the things of Heaven to her it would seem no strange thing to enter Heaven. To her parents, sisters, and affianced, the Guardian tenders most sincere sympathy.

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Died

SIMONS- At Wood Islands, East, Sept. 6th, Mrs. D. A. Simmons, aged twenty, leaving a child, Mother and father, two sisters and three brothers.

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Obituary

A gloom was cast over the community of Hopefield on the morning of Juy 12th when the death was announced of the death of Columbina, the beloved wife of Mr. Angus D. Smith. The deceased who was twenty-eight years of age was married only a year, and besides her husband one child. She was a daughter of Mr. James McDonald, Hopefield. She was a person of most amiable character who will be greatly missed, especially in the section of the congregation to which she belonged in the work of which she took an active part. The funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. A. J. MacNeill, who was assisted by Rev. S. D. McPhee of Belfast, a brother - in - law. Both of these testified to the high character of the deceased and spoke of the large place which she filled in the life of the community. The husband, parents and family of the deceased have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in their sorrow.

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Well Known Lady Has Passed Away

There passed to her rest at Eldon on Feb. ninth, Anne E., beloved wife of John McLellan in the 8th [sic] year of her age. She leaves to mourn, a heart broken husband, also four sons, and two daughters. The sons are Albert and Frank of Portland, Maine, John and Aubrey at home. The daughters are Jennie at home and Mrs. MacPherson of Newtown. She was laid to rest in the Belfast Cemetery on the afternoon of Feb. the twelfth. Rev. D. B. McLeod conducted the services and spoke words of sweet peace and comfort to the mourning family and friends. She was a faithful wife, a kind and indulgent mother, and will be missed greatly in the home.

Asleep in Jesus blessed sleep
From which none ever wakes to weep
A calm and undisturbed repose
Unbroken by the last of foes.

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Died

McDonald- At Garfield, Nov 13, 1909, Annetta, daughter of Charles and Mrs. McDonald, aged nineteen years.

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Belfast Church

Sabbath .. [text obliterated] a day long to be remembered in the history of St. John's Church, Belfast. The Church having undergone extensive repairs it was on that day reopened for the public worship of God. The day from early morning was gloomy and threatening, but at eleven o'clock, a.m., the large and sacred edifice was filled to its utmost capacity. Rev. D. Mackenzie of Wood Islands, conducted the Gaelic Service, preaching from Ezra VII: 27. His theme was "Beautifying the House of the Lord". Rev. D. B. McLeod, Orwell, then followed with an English service, preaching from Luke XIV: 31. His subject being the foundation, building, costliness, and usefullness of the Christian character. Rev. S. L. McPhee, the pastor gave a brief historical sketch of the congregation. It is eighty five years old. It has enjoyed the ministry of Rev. John McLennan, Rev. Alex McKay, Rev. Alex M. McLean, Rev. A. S. Stewart, Rev. A. McLean Sinclair, and Rev. S. D. McPhe. At five o'clock p.m., the Rev. L. Beaton, of Roxborough, Ontario preched from Matt XVI, 18,19. His subject being the true foundation and power of the Christian Church. The attention paid at the services was excellent, and, the order was all that could be desired. The choir rendered valuable assistance with the praise part of the service. Honorable mention was made of the Board of Trustee and Ladies' Aid for their valuable work. The present beautiful condition of the Church reflects great credit on the congregation, and The Guardian predicts an era of great future prosperity for the Belfast congregation. This is undoubtedly one of the most important country congregations in the Maritime Provinces - Com.

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News From Flat River

A correspondent from Flat River writes: Angus N. McDonald, with the aid of William McPherson, succeeded in preparing for market one of the largest hogs ever raised in this community. Wellington Compton is at present visiting in Murray River the guest of A. M. Ross. John D. McKenzie, Melville, has been visiting friends in Flat River. D. J. Riley is spending the remainder of his Christmas holidays in Halifax, N.S. Miss Myrtle Ross is visiting in Flat River the guest of Annie Ross.

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Death

There died at Belfast, P. E. I., Feb 19th, Angus R. McAulay, in the thirtieth year of his age. For eight years he was a resident of Sydney where he made many friends by his cheerful disposition and good fellowship. Three years ago, tuberculosis manifested itself and he left Sydney for his old home on P. E. I. hoping in a short time to throw off the disease and return to Sydney, but he was not permitted to accomplish this desire. During his sickness, he mediated much upon the hymn, "Nearer My God to Thee." His widow is a daughter of John N. McDonald of Sydney and a brother, John S. McDonald and sister Mrs. Murdoch McAskill also reside in this city. - Sydney Ex.

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Death

On February 20th, the Angel of Death visited the home of Daniel and Mrs. McAulay, Earnscliffe, and took from them their son, Angus, aged twenty-nine years. Mr. McAulay had been in ill health for the last two years, having contracted a cold while in Sydney, C. B. Everything that a loving Father and Mother could do was done to relieve his suffering. Great hopes were held at times for his recovery but death finally claimed him. His bright and manly disposition endeared hi to al who had the pleasure of knowing him. He was a devout Christian, always loving and trusting in Jesus, and his last thoughts and words were of his Saviour. Besides his father and mother, he leaves to mourn a loving wife, three sisters and three brothers. His funeral was largely attended. The services at the house were conducted by Rev. Mr. MacKenzie assisted by Rev. F. Dresser. - Com.

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Wedding

The home of Murdoch McLeod, Orwell, was the scene of a happy event, Wednesday evening, January 25th, 1911, when his daughter, Christina Florence was united in marriage to John Angus Martin of Eldon. The ceremony was conducted in the presence of a few immediate friends and relatives, by the Rev. D. B. McLeod. The bride, who was unattended, was comingly attired in a gown of gray broadcloth, The popularity of the contracting parties was attested to by the numerous presents both useful and valuable which they received. After a bountiful supper was served, the evening passed away pleasantly in conversation and harmless games. Mr. and Mrs. Martin will reside near Eldon.

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Christmas Tree and Entertainment

The annual Christmas tree and entertainment at Roseberry has passed into history. Pleasant recollections of the joyous event linger in the memory of every participant of the occasion. The united forces of the I. O. G. T. Lodge and Sunday School of that community make a combination that is hard to excel in the promotion of social gatherings, yet, in the celebration of 1910, they eclipsed their best efforts of past years. The tree, decorated with tinsel and ornaments, and laden with tangible expressions of good will, between friend and friend, very creditably displayed the artistic taste of those in charge. One cannot refrain from especially mentioning the ladies, for their exertions in the preparation of a repast that would satisfy a most fastidious epicure. The tables fairly groaned under the weight of good things. When at six p.m., Harry Blake, as chairman, happily announced the supper ready, the ladies became busily engaged for the next two hours in satisfying the wants of the inner man, during which time, some sixty people partook of the feast./ After a select program, interspersed with a few gramophone selections, Santa Claus introduce himself with a song, "I'm a jolly, jolly, jolly old Boy." Proceeding to denude the heavily laden tree, he lavished his gifts to young and old, forgetting no one present. After a liberal distribution of nuts and candy to the children, he made his departure, bidding one and all, "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year." The committee were deeply grateful to the ladies whose untiring efforts made the enjoyable affair such a grand success. - Com.

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Untitled

Angus McWilliam and his daughter, Florence return to Boston today after spending a delighful vacation in Belfast with Mrs. Chas. J. McWIlliam and with Miss Elizabeth McDonald at Roseneath. They speak with enthusiasm of the excellent crops and P. E. Island as a tourist resort for tourists. The climate cannot be surpassed and the people are proverbial as spectators. What is wanted is free trade with the United States and a tunnel to the mainland.

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Fire

On Sunday last, Malcolm Finlayson of Eldon had his barn, hennery and piggery destroyed by fire, together with all his hay crop and a portion of the contents of his barn, including shingles, &c. Almost all of the agricultural implements were saved. The fire started in the barrack at the back of the barn.

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Death

BUCHANAN - At Eldon, Belfast, on March 12th, 1911, Walter David Buchanan, dearly beloved and youngest child of William and Margaret Buchanan, aged eight months and nine days.

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Died

DIXON - At Little Sands, March 11, 1911, Robert T. Dixon, aged 76. Funeral service at his late residence on Tuesday, the 14th, at 10 a.m. Interment Belfast Cemetery.

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Birth

MACWILLIAM - To Charles and Mrs. MacWilliam, Garfield, on Wednesday, March 29th inst., 1911, a son.

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New Preacher

The Uigg and Belfast Baptist churches have extended a call to Rev. Frank P. Dresser. Mr. Dresser has accepted the call. The churches are to be congratulated upon securing the services of such a talented preacher, who comes from Seal Harbour, N.S., where he has laboured during the past three years. Mr. Dresser will begin work on his new field on Sunday, the 29th inst., preaching at Uigg 1. A.m., Grandview, 3 p.m., and Eldon, 7 p.m.

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Death

The death occurred in Pt. Prim on Feb 20th of Mrs. Archibald McRae, aged 84 years. She leaves to mourn besides other relatives, two daughters, Mrs. James Kennedy, Murray Harbour North; and Mrs. James Donavon, California. The funeral took place Feb. 2nd from her late residence to the cemetery at Belfast. The services at the house and at the grave were conducted by Rev. J. W. McKenzie.

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News From Orwell Cove

An Orwell Cove correspondent writes: John McLean and Wm. McDonald are home on a two month's visit. Miss Mary Inman, Grandview, was a recent visitor. James Morrisey has sold a handsome colt. Angus J. Nicholson owns a handsome Commodore colt. Orwell School is doing good work under the teachers, Sinclair McDonald and Miss Sarah Nicholson. W. W. Gillis and John McLean were recent visitors to Eldon. Some of the farmers are getting their mud-diggers out.

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Death

There passed to her eternal rest at Garfield on the 24th of February, Ann MacDonald, in the 76th year of her age. Deceased was the third daughter of Isabella and John MacDonald of Glashvin. She leaves to mourn two sisters, Margaret, Mrs. William N. MacLeod, and May, Mrs. Willie Ross of the same place. She was of a kind disposition and beloved by all her friends.

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Died

McDONALD - At Point Prim, March 13, 1911, John R. McDonald, aged 75 years. Funeral notice later.

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Died

McKINNON - At the home of M. W. Murchison, Belfast, on Jan. 6th, Sarah McKinnon, late of Dundas, King's Co., in the 80th year of her age.

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Untitled

The many friends of Mrs. Douglas Cantloe, Pinette Bridge, will be glad to know that she has returned home from the P. E. I. Hospital where she went through a successful operation. Mrs. Cantloe speaks highly of this grand institution and is loud in her praises of the kind matron and nurses and the kindness shown her while there which she will not forget. Mrs. Cantloe is doing as well as can be expected.

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Wedding Bells

The following further additional particulars of Miss Murray's marriage will be of interest.: An event of particular interest to the people of New London and vicinity took place in the St. John's Presbyterian Church on the evening of December 27th, when Miss Lena Bessie Murray, only daughter of the Pastor, John Murray, and a graduate of the Ladies' College, Halifax, was united in marriage to the Rev. Albert M. MacLeod, B. A., now minister of the First Presbyterian Church, Hyde Park, Boston. The church was beautiful for the occasion with fitting decorations. The bride looked charming dressed in a tailored suit of dark blue broadcloth with hat to match and wore an elegant ostrich boa. At 5 o'clock the bride, leaning on the arm of her father and carrying a large shower bouquet of bridal roses and maiden hair fern tied with white satin streamers, entered the church to the sweet strains of Lohengrin's wedding march, Here Comes the Bride, played by Mrs. (Rev.) G. Sutherland of Kensington. The ceremony was performed with due solemnity by the bride's father, assisted by Rev. Mr. Sutherland, while the contracting parties stood under a beautiful evergreen arch, from which there hung a most artistic wedding bell. The ceremony performed, followed by the officiating clergymen and the four ushers, they marched down the left aisle to the swelling notes of the dismissal march. After luncheon at the Manse, the happy couple departed amidst showers of rice and ringing of bells. The bride was the recipient of many handsome and costly presents, the groom's gift being an elegant mounted manicure set accompanied by a substantial cheque, while the bride's father presented her with a valuable German clock in solid Mahogany base. The congratulations of New London and Summerfield, together with the W. F. M. S. of New London all donated well filled purses of gold accompanied by expressions of the high esteem in which the bride was held.

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Died

MacINNES - At Pinette on Jan 7th, 1912, Miss Margaret McInnes aged 68 years, leaving three sisters and three brothers to mourn.

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Died

McMILLAN - At Eldon, Belfast, April 18, 1912, after a lingering illness of pneumonia, Ann Hynes, Beloved wife of Alexander McMillan, aged 70 years. "May her soul Rest in Peace." Funeral notice later.

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Accident

The many friends of Owen Hughes, Iona, will regret to hear that while he was driving on Great George St. yesterday afternoon, he collided with a sleigh coming from the opposite direction. Mr. Hughes was violently thrown to the ground, and when help arrived, it was seen that he was seriously injured. Medical aid was called, and on examination, it was found that he had sustained a dislocation of the right shoulder. He was taken to City Hospital and the shoulder redressed. Up to the present he is doing nicely. Mr. Hughes is a well known local horseman. As far as could be learned no blame could be attached to either driver, as both were ignorant of the other's approach until too late.

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Obituary

There passed away at Millvale, on December 28th, after a long illness which he bore with exemplary patience, Daniel McKinnon, aged forty-two years. Deceased spent the last eleven years in Sydney, but owing to ill health was obliged to leave and on the eve of his departure his fellow workers presented him with a purse containing a large sum of money, thus giving tangible expression of the esteem in which he was held by them. He leaves a widow, three daughters and two sons to mourn a loving husband and father. This is the second bereavement in this family within the past six weeks. The youngest son, a bright boy of two years and eight months, having predeceased the father on the 16th of November.

Funeral

Charles McKinnon, a widely known and well loved friend and citizen, departed from this life at his home in Uigg, Saturday Oct. 28th, 1911 in the 54th year of his age.

His illness was brief and the announcement of his death was a shock to the whole community. Mr. McKinnon belonged to a highly respected family, some members of whom have distinguished themselves in their chosen professions. He was a brother of the Hon. D. A. McKinnon of Charlottetown, who was the popular Governor of Prince Edward Island for five years. Another brother, Artemas is a prominent surgeon in Lincoln, Nebraska. Malcolm another brother is at home. His sisters are Mrs. George Brehaut of Murray Harbour and Mrs. A. F. Bruce of Valleyfield. He leaves a widow and four children to mourn the loss of a loving husband and a most affectionate parent. Charlie, as he was familiarly called, was greatly beloved by a large circle of acquaintances. He was interested in everything that pertained to the welfare of the Province. He was a valued adherent to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Orwell, and a member of the choir for many years. The deceased was possessed of musical talents of a high order and a charming personality which made him a welcome member to any society. Many friends with floral tributes were present from Charlottetown and other parts of the Province. The services which were the most impressive were conducted by the pastor, Rev. B. McLeod. Other ministers who were present and assisted at the solemn services were Rev. Mr. Dresser, pastor of the Baptist Church, Uigg, where the principal service was held. Rev. George Orman, pastor of the Methodist Church, Vernon River, Rev. A. J. McNeill of Murray Harbour and one time pastor at Orwell, and Rev. J. W. McKenzie of Belfast. The pallbearers were John A. McQueen, Peter Musick, John A. McLeod, U. W. McLeod, Charles McKinnon, Brooklyn, and Hayden VanIderstine.

The singing which was appropriate and effective was in the charge of Mrs. L. R. Ings of Orwell. The large audience was deeply moved, and many of them resolved to live nearer to God from this time forth. The deceased, who was in comfortable circumstances and the head of a happy family was cut down in the prime of life. Before the end came, he gave evidence of being reconciled to yield up his life to God who gave it. To friends standing near him he said, "Your Savior is my Savior." His prayer was: "Come Lord for I am Ready." During his last night on earth he was heard to repeat the words, "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere." The services at the church were fittingly concluded by the singing of this favorite hymn of the departed. The solo by Mrs. Ings touched a chord in every heart and brought tears from many eyes. The body was tenderly laid to rest by the side of the precious dust of father, mother, brother and sister in the Cemetery, Uigg. The funeral is over, friends return to their homes, their feelings may be expressed in those words, "farewell Charlie, we will meet you when the day dawns and the shadows flee away."

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Funeral

The funeral services of the late George McLean, son of the late Rev. R. McLean, Valleyfield, took place at the St. James Church Manse, Charlottetown, last evening at 8:30, Rev. Fullerton officiating. The remains will cross to Pictou on the first steamer and will be forwarded to Hampton P.O. for interment. Donald McLean, brother of the deceased, arrived in Charlottetown from Vancouver on the last trip of the Earl Grey.

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Fire

At 2 p.m. Saturday last it looked as though Mt. Stewart was in for another serious fire. Rev. Mr. Weeks noticed the roof of Daniel McWilliam's house (near the parsonage) on fire shortly after it got started and quickly gave the alarm. After an hour of sheer hard, plucky work the fire was got under control. All the furniture in the house was removed. The house was very badly damaged by both the fire and water - the latter destroying the plaster on come of the ceilings. The day being extremely cold making it a trying job but Mt. Stewart can boast of a plucky lot of men when it comes to a task like the one just referred to. It is time that the village had some modern fire outfit - for had this fire not been got under control the new Railway station would have been made pretty warm.

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Prices

A resident of Montague, who has been a clerk in his uncle's store over fifty years ago at Orwell Head, writes the following information concerning the different prices farmers get for their produce, eggs, milk, and poultry today, to fifty years ago. The writer says that the farmer's wife had to give eight dozen eggs for one pound of tea and four bushels of oats for the same quantity. Flour was then from ten to twelve dollars a barrel, sugar 7 , Molasses 50 , Cottons and prints of all kinds were from 16 to 25 per yard, boots and shoes dearer than they are now, and the farmer was only getting 16 per bushel for his oats and potatoes, one dollar for a lamb, $2.00 for a sheep, $10 to $15 for his best cow, &68 to $70 for his best horse. The only article that was cheap then was Scotch whiskey, which was sold for 80 per gallon, and is now sold in Montague for 80 per pint.

Now, on P.E.Island, the farmer can get 8 lbs. of tea for 8 doz. eggs and 8 lbs. of tea for 4 bushels of oats, and 60 for his potatoes and if you don't grow wheat, you can get a barrel of flour at the Montague Mills for $4.50. No better flour a person wants in their house. Cottons, prints, and all kinds of dry goods at half the price they were 50 years ago. And now, I think the farmer should be rich when he gets $5 for a sheep, $3 for a lamb, $30 to $60 for a cow, $150 to $250 for a horse, $1 for a hundred pounds of milk to be made into butter or cheese. Now the farmers should prosper as they are doing when they get such prices to what the farmer of fifty years ago was getting. Great contrast between the year 1857 and year 1912 when I pound of tea can be bought now for 12 eggs, then for 96 eggs. Year 1857 eggs 8 per dozen, tea, 64 per lb. -M.

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In Memoriam

Lines written to the memory of Ada B. McLeod by her mother:-

Darling Ada, I wish you were here I feel so lonely today.
It seemed hard that you had to leave us, God's Holy will to obey.

When I think of your bright, cheerful presence, as together we worked day by day,

It seemed hard that so early in youth You were called to that home far away.

We say far away, but 'tis near us, For our loved ones are gathering there
On the bright shore to bid us a welcome, Where there is no sorrow or care.

Dear Ada, my life is so lonely, I yearn for your presence again
I would like now to have you beside me, But surely my loss is your gain.

You are free from the world's tears and sadness, You are freefrom all sorrow and pain
You are safe in the arms of you Saviour And some day we'll meet you again.

For we know not the day or the hour, When we too are bidden to rise
From this world with its sorrows and trials, To meet with God an the skies.

May God give us grace to surrender Our hearts and our lives to his will,
That when we too are called up yonder, The cup of our joy he may fill.

For there when our sins are all pardoned, And we are accepted as Thine,
In happy reunion with loved ones. We'll dwell in God's presence divine.

Dear Ada, I'm lonely without you, But I must not mourn or complain
For God not only lent you to mother, Then called for His treasure again.

You only were lent for a season To teach us while living below
To be ever patient in suffering and ready when God bids us go.

And now you are safe with your Saviour; We know you are happy and blessed
We will try to submit to God's pleasure, For he doeth all things for best.

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A Belfast Scrapbook, Page 2
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