The California Association


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Transcribed by T. W. Stewart

We regret to inform you that Tom passed away in Ottawa, Ont. Monday, October 16, 2006 at the age of 84.

Ch'town Royal Gazette, Aug. 21, 1849

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION

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Capital 4000

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In Forty Shares of One hundred Pounds each

The objects of this Association are to proceed to the above named Country, and there to dispose of its available resources, either of property or labor, to the best advantage.

The means intended to be used to accomplish these purposes are ---

FIRST --- To purchase a Vessel, (arrangements having already been entered into for one in every way adapted for the enterprize.)

SECOND --- To man her, if possible, by the Shareholders; to victual her for Two years, (the space of time proposed to be absent from the Island) ; and to take a sufficiency of material for the employment of the Mechanical portion of the Association, during the outward voyage.

In order to the well-working of the enterprize, the Projectors have adopted the following as PRINCIPLES for the government of the Association :-

The Association is to be composed of FORTY respectable and discreet men, all and each of whom are expected to bear an equal share of the expense and labor connected with the enterprize. Any person wishing to embark in the undertaking, but who may not be disposed to go himself, may take any number of shares not exceeding FOUR, and will be allowed to send a substitute for each Share, provided always, that the said substitute be acceptable to that portion of the Association intending to go.

The profits realized by the enterprize are to be equally divided, and in the event of the death of any Member of the Association, during his absence from the Island, an equal share of the amounts of profit shall be given to the friends of the deceased.

Each Member will be required to pledge himself not to drink any Intoxicating Liquors, nor to play at Cards, Dice, or any other species of Gambling, during his absence from the Island. Also, to respect the Sabbath, and to allowing nothing to induce him to desecrate that Holy Day in the form of labor or trade, but what may be absolutely necessary for the safety of the Ship and his own life.

As soon as Three-fourths of the Shares be taken up, a Board of Directors will be chosen, a Deed of Co-partnership entered into, and such Bye Laws, founded on the Principles already enumerated, or hereafter to be enumerated,) will be adopted, as may be required for the good government of the Association.

Any Member violating the Principles and Bye Laws of the Association, will be bound to submit to such penalty as the majority of the Members may deem proper to impose, otherwise to forfeit all Right, Title, and Interest in the Association.

As it is necessary that all arrangements be completed as soon as possible; a fortnight only, from this date, is allowed for the taking up of the few remaining Shares - at the expiration of which time a Meeting of Shareholders will be held in Charlottetown, for the purpose of electing Directors, and adopting Rules for the regulation of the Association, at which Meeting, it is expected, that a deposit of 10 per cent, on each Share be paid.

The Public cannot fail to perceive the many advantages which an Association of this kind offers to persons desirous of bettering their circumstances, by directing their energies to a field of labor, from which they may safely calculate upon an ample reward.. As by the arrangements made, most of the disadvantages to which others have been compelled to submit will be avoided :- The difficulty of getting thither by a Chartered Vessels, by private passage, or by any of the overland routs. The high rate paid in California for living and other contingencies, being such as almost to neutralize the profits of labor. These will be obviated, by the Association supplying themselves with Provisions, &c., for Two years. Which with the combined efforts for the general weal, cannot fail to ensure success.

JOHN PIDWELL, Secretary pro tem

Charlottetown, Aug 20, 1849.

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DEPARTURE OF THE FANNY FOR CALIFORNIA 1849

The Islander Nov. 16, 1849.

DEPARTURE OF THE 'CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION'

The Brig "Fanny" with the "California Association" on board, has at length sailed, and under very favourable circumstances. On the morning of their departure, the wind came gradually round from the Eastward - from whence it had blown for the previous ten days - to the North-west, and has continued in that quarter ever since; and no doubt ere this they have taken leave of the Nova Scotia land and shaped their course for the Windward Islands. We cannot conclude these few remarks without observing, that to the very great interest taken in the undertaking by James Peake, Esq., our worthy and enterprising townsman, is the successful formation of the "Association" to be attributed; he voluntarily offered to become their Agent - attended their meetings, and by his experience and tact, pointed out to them the articles best to be shipped, the cheapest market to procure their provisions, superintended the fitting out of the vessel, &c., &c.; and when all were ready to take their final departure, sent his Steamer, free of charge, and towed them seven or eight miles out to sea, allowing their friends to accompany them as far as the Steamer went. We sincerely wish them a pleasant and a prosperous voyage, and trust that they may realize their most sanguine expectations. We copy the following remarks

From last Tuesday's Gazette:

CALIFORNIA. "Sailed from Charlottetown, on the 12th inst., followed by the good wishes and prayers of several hundreds, the Brig FANNY, direct for San Francisco, calling at Rio Janeiro and Valparaiso. This being the first vessel from this Island to the newly discovered Paetolus, deserves more than a passing notice. The Fanny is owned and fitted out by an Association of Forty persons - Mechanics - Clerks - Farmers, all active - steady - sober men of good character and industrious habits, actuated, for the most part, as we believe, with a laudable desire to better the condition of themselves and their families, by sharing in the trade suddenly opened up on the Western shores of North America. The Fanny has all her available space occupied by lumber, (three house frames), bricks, coal, &c., and provisions of such kinds as will keep for two years. As no event of a like nature, has ever occurred before in this town, that of an emigration from our shores, of persons similarly circumstanced, so no event has called forth, to an equal degree, the heart-felt interest and sympathy for the adventurers; some of whom are young men, connected with the oldest and most extensive families in the Colony, while others are themselves fathers of families - who leave wives and children to grieve their present departure, and to hope for the successful ???? of their adventure. It added to the temporary interest of the scene that in the morning the Sun arose in full effulgence, and the weather throughout the day was as warm and fine as we usually experience it in September, so different from the bleak or damp weather generally prevalent in the middle of November; that we hail it as it were a presage for good - an omen of success to the enterprising voyagers. The Steamer Rose, with about three hundred persons on board, took the Fanny in tow at two o'clock, and in half an hour she was seen swiftly passing the chops of the harbour. The Wharves, which throughout the day, had been crowded in excess, with anxious lookers on, became gradually deserted, and at length none were left but the truckmen plying their ordinary labor, and no vestige of the busy scene remained.

We subjoin the following List of the shareholders and Passengers."

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MARRIED

At Charlottetown on Friday, the 9th inst, by the Rev. David Fitzgerald, MR. A CAMPBELL IRVING, to ELIZA, daughter of John Clark, Esq., Cape Traverse.

Sad Note:Captain Irving fell ill and died of cholera while in California, leaving his newly wed bride a widow, who learned of this till one year after the fact. She then wed Robert Boswell Sept. 14, 1854, and after his death, a Capt. McKenzie.


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