A Belfast, P.E.I. Scrapbook, 1901-1912


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Transcribed by Dave Hunter - dhunter@islandregister.com


The following scrapbook was bought at a recent auction sale in Belfast by Don Snow, who graciously donated it to the Register, so that the records would be available to not only us here on P.E.I., but to everyone who might have an interest to the individuals named in the book…. Thank you Don!

Most of the clippings in the book do not have the name of the paper, or the date of publication. A large number were from the Guardian, as references within the text of the articles confirm. The clippings in the book seem to be in no particular date order, perhaps indicating that the clippings were pasted in the book at a later time. These clippings make up a charming history of the area - not only vital statistics, but also "community notes" giving insight into life in the Belfast region at the turn of the century. An interesting side note: The clippings were pasted into a very old copy of Puss 'n Boots, a children's book. Every page is filled. "Waste not, want not," perhaps evidence of the Scottish frugality of the residents of the district which helped them to thrive in this Island community.

This is a good example of an obscure little document that one might be tempted to throw away, thinking it would be of no use to anyone, which can truly be a gem in the rough. To anyone who's ancestors are named in this document, it will be a wonderful find. It will be interesting also to anyone striving to understand what early life on P.E.I. was like - even at the turn of the century, life was hard, but the spirit and faith of the people can truly be an inspiration for all of us.

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Belfast Hint: Many of these clippings contain only a month, date, and no year. Many also include the day of the week. If you have the month, date, and day of week, you can calculate the year using our perpetual calendar. We know the majority of these clippings were from the years of 1901 to 1912. By using the calendar, and checking out the target month and date in each year, looking for a day match, you will be able to determine the year of the clipping.

Photo (left), St. John's Presbyterian Church, Belfast, P.E.I. - July 1, 2000. Click photo to peek inside!

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A Few of the Ships that Never Returned

The following interesting item is written by a seaman of the old school from personal recollections and records.

In the summer of 1867 the full rigged ship Isabel, owned by James Duncan & Co., commanded by Capt. Alexander McDonald, familiarly known as Sandy Hector of Point Prim, with Capt. Roderick Cameron as mate. [This is the end of the sentence - it is not mis-transcribed] Cameron left her in Charlottetown. Donald McAuley, also of Point Prim then went as mate and Simon M. Murchison, A. B. also sailed with her. She came out from Glasgow and loaded oats here for New York and arrived there in due time and discharged and reloaded wheat for England. She sailed in good time and that was the last that was ever heard of her. One of Capt. McDonald's daughters with her husband, Mr. Donald McDonald is stopping this winter with their son, Major Dan McDonald, owner and proprietor of the Russ Hotel [once again, this is as written - from now on in similar cases, I will use only the familiar [sic] following misspellings and other uncompleted sentences].

Capt. Sandy Hector has another grandson living here namely Mr. A. W. Hyndman, manager of the Royal Bank in Charlottetown.

In the next fall 1868 the Brig Hellen Davies, commanded by Capt. Jim Murchison sailed from here, bound for the Barbadoes. Capt. Murchison was also a native of Point Prim. The Hellen Davies was loaded with a general cargo and a deck load of horses. She sailed from Charlottetown, and that was the last ever heard of her.

The Brig Comet sailed from Charlottetown the same fall, 1868, bound for Bermuda. Capt. Smith was in command and that was the last that was ever heard of the Comet.

Ten Years later, the new Barquentine Vigilent, 475 tons, owned by Welch and Owens, sailed from Baltimore in Sept. 1878 loaded with wheat. She was commanded by Capt. Malcolm McLean of Surrey Belfast and there were with him, Peter Green, second mate, and Martin O'Neil, A.B. and a coloured cook all belonging to this Island. The Vigilant was bound for Oporto, in Portugal, but was never heard of again.

These are some of the ships that never returned.

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Champagne Seized in P.E.I. Potatoes

NEW YORK, Feb 23 - One hundred and thirty eight cases of high grade champagne estimated at current wholesale bootleg prices to be worth between $30,000 and $40,000 were found hidden under a consignment of Prince Edward [sic] Potatoes on the arrival of a freight car from New Brunswick and seized by prohibition officers last Thursday.

The 346 sacks of potatoes, which have not been claimed by the consignee, will be sold at auction, but not the champagne. [J Wonder why not?]

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In Memoriam

In loving memory of my dear Mother, Mrs. Horace Smith who departed this life in October, 1918.

Eight years have passed since that sad day,
When God called one I loved away,
The Blow was hard, the shock severe,
I little thought the end was near.

Inserted by her daughter, Ida.

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In Memoriam

In Loving Memory of Mrs. Samuel M. MacWilliam, who departed this life February 25th, 1901.

Silent thoughts bring many a tear,
Of one we miss and loved so dear.

Ever remembered by her Husband and daughters.

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Birth

DOUGLAS - At the P. E. Island Hospital on April 8th, to Mr. And Mrs. Lester Douglas (nee Mary Balderston), a son.

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Wedding Bells

Mrs. F. Hudson, 950 22nd Ave., East Vancouver, B. C. announces the marriage of her daughter, Miss Laura S. to Mr. A. J. Williams, son of Mrs. C. J. Williams of 615 18th Ave., West Vancouver, formerly of Eldon, P.E.I. The ceremony performed July 5th by the Rev. Mr. McGougan at the Chalmers Church Manse.

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Deaths

McWILLIAMS - At Ocean View, December 26, 1922, Daniel McWilliams, aged 63. Funeral Friday at two O'clock to Belfast Cemetery.

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Social Gathering

The home of Mr. And Mrs. McIsaac of Eldon was nicely decorated on Jany 2nd in honour of Mrs. McIsaac's neighbours and friends who were invited in for a goose supper.

The guests had a real good time.

Mr. John S. Martin carved in the fashion of long ago, the table bountifully spread with every good thing the season offered. The gentlemen kept the fun going all through the supper, ably helped by the ladies, one of whom gave an address on Church affairs that made a good laugh. The guests were prettily dressed with short sleeves, low necks, bobbed hair, etc., and after a hearty vote of thanks to the Hostess for her well served meal, they left at a late hour for home with Jack Frost blowing cold wintery blasts.

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Died

MCLEOD - At Orwell, Aug. 25, 1910, Neil McLeod, aged 80 years. Funeral, Friday 36th at 4:30 P.m.

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Untitled

A clipping from an Olympia paper announces the sad death of Malcolm J. Weatherbie, which took place in St. Peter's hospital on June 27, after lying in an unconscious condition since his accident on Friday, June 24. Mr. Weatherbie, a well know pioneer wood dealer and businessman of that city, driving along a country road accompanied by his little son Fay, when the horse he was driving became frightened by a dog and jumping to one side, threw the occupants from the sulky. Fay fell clear of the rig in which they were riding, but Mr. Weatherbie was caught by his feet and dragged for a quarter of a mile. When the horse was stopped Mr. Weatherbie was picked up with his scalp and one ear torn loose from his head and the flesh on his shoulders ground down to the bone. He was at once harried to the hospital where Drs. Riley and Ingham worked on the unconscious man for several hours but all to no avail. On Monday evening death ended his sufferings. Mr. Weatherbie left his native home twenty-two years ago, having ever since made his home in Olympia. He married Miss Mary Dockerty, a native of Vernon River, P.E.I. He was for a number of years a member of the volunteer fire department and for more that fourteen years attended every fire in Olympia. On arriving in Olympia, while still a young man, Mr. Weatherbie was practically penniless, but at the time of his death was a well to do businessman, owning considerable property in the City and a well cultivated farm of one hundred and sixty acres south of the city. He was a member of the Foresters of America and the Fraternal Brotherhood.

His funeral took place Wednesday June 29th and was largely attended, Rev. David McDonald officiating at the house and grave. Deceased was in his 47th year and is survived by his wife and six children, four boys, William, George, Fay and Cecil, and two girls, Pansy and Ida, also three brothers, William of Olympia and George of Vancouver, who were telephoned for at the time of their brother's accident and remained by his side till the last, and John T. of Ocean View, P.E.I., three sisters, Mrs. John Dockerty, New Haven, P.E.I., Mrs. Ronald McLellan, Glace Bay, C.B., and Mrs. Murdock Buchannan of Boston, Mass, besides a large host of friends and relatives who will be greatly shocked to hear of his sudden and untimely death.

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Untitled

Capt. M. McLeod, Vancouver, accompanied by his two daughters, is staying at the Victoria. Capt. McLeod arrived in this city some days ago, and will spend some to months in this Province, of which he is a native. He formerly belonged to Belfast and it is twenty-one years since he visited his homeland. He left the Province after the Prince Edward Island Bank became insolvent, by which he as one of the principal investors, was a heavy loser.

He went out to Vancouver at that time, accompanied by his wife and one daughter, who is now with him on his visit here, and had remained in Vancouver since. Until recently, Capt. McLeod has been harbour master and port warden of Vancouver harbour, a position he has filled for the past number of years. He is among the number of energetic Provincialists who, in far off fields, have had had successful careers as officials in important departments and can be termed, "a successful Islander abroad". Although his years are not few his bearing gives no indication of their being a burden to carry, for he is as vigorous and keen as many who have not passed the forty year mark. Speaking of Vancouver, Capt. McLeod says it is advancing in leaps and bounds and in referring to the changes in this city in the twenty one years of his absence he seemed to think the greatest change was apparent in the people, nearly all those who were leaders in the social, political, and commercial life before Mr. McLeod left the Province having passed away.

He has a number of relatives in this city and in different parts of King's and Queen's Counties. His wife, at present in Vancouver, is a sister of A. G. Cogswell, of Georgetown. He, and the two Misses McLeod will spend a couple of months before returning home.

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Untitled

On Monday last, Rosebery Lodge, No. 5, was called to order at the usual time and opened in ritual form. After the regular business was transacted, the following officers were installed by [sic] Lodge. Deputy John W. Smith, assisted my Mrs. H. M. Blake and Mrs. MacDonald as installing Marshalls:- C. T., H. M. Blake; V. T., W. H. McInnis; R. Sec'y, Mabel McInnis; Fin. Sec'y, George Panton; Treas., Arthur Hubley; Marshal, Alvah Hubley; Chaplain, Diana Morrison; Guard, Angus MacDonald; Sentinel, Neil S. Morrison; Dep. Mrshall, Frank A. Stewart; Organist, Nellie Hubley; P. C. T., Rupert Hubley. As usual a pleasing program was presented to the satisfaction of those present and the Lodge closed in ritual form. The Guardian wishes Rosebery Lodge every success. [Guardian, year and date Unknown]

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Marriage

LESLIE-STEWART - At the Queen Hotel, Charlottetown, Aug 17, 1910, by the Bride's father, Rev. A. S. Stewart of Valleyfield, Frank Willoughby Leslie of Magdalen Islands to Isabel Stewart of Valleyfield.

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Born

KENNEDY - At Point Prim, Aug. 11, 1910, to William and Mrs. Kennedy, a son.

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Orwell Cove

A correspondent from Orwell Cove writes:- Farmers are busily engaged in threshing, and the results show the best returns for some years - Robert Cook has returned home from visiting friends in Garfield. - Miss Mabel Anderson leaves this week on return to the United States. - Hector A. McDonald is making considerable strides in the improvements in his outbuildings. - A. J. Nicholson and Jospeph Bremnick have returned home after attending the exhibition. - Brush Wharf is being repaired under the supervision of David Smith, Kinlock. - Jos. Morrissey and John McLeod are preparing for their fall's sport of shooting wild geese. - Mr. McLeod is one of the crack shots of the village. - Orwell Cove School is doing good work under the careful management of Sinclair McDonald and Miss Sarah Nicholson. - E. D. McLeod and John A. McLeod have returned home after visiting friends in Grandview. - William D. Gillis and Duncan McKenzie passed through Orwell on their way to Kinross Thuesday evening. - Miss Mary Inman, Grandview, paid a flying visit to Orwell Cove recently. - Amos McLeod, painter has completed his contract painting Allen B. McDonald's residence. Duncan McDonald is breaking in a new colt which promises to be a fast one. - Daniel S???? is busily engaged in threshing in this section. - W. J. Gillis who has been visiting in Belfast returned home. - Arthur J. Gillis has purchased a skye terrier, which he intends to train for hunting purposes. - Wilfred McLean is visiting friends in Millview. - Jas. E. McDonald has a Woodburn colt which shows some very fine "bursts" of speed and he expects to take the lead this coming winter. - John A. Murchison, cheese maker is to be congratulated in securing two valuable prizes for cheese at the St. John Exhibition.

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Untitled

Among the passengers to port yesterday via S. S. Halifax, was Captain James Munroe, Belfast. Mr. Munroe has been captain of the pleasure yacht, "Nona" for the past three years. This yacht is owned by Messrs. Albright and Dyer, Boston, and during the summer months, cruses on pleasure ships around the New England coasts. Captain Munroe is only a young man and deserves credit for the success he has attained in procuring captain's papers at the "hub".

 

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Married

McLENNAN-WOOD - On Nov. 23, at St. James' Manse, Brighton, by Rev. T. F. Fullerton, John R. McLellan to Gertrude N. Wood.

McCabe-Brehaut - At the Baptist Church, Alexandra, Wednesday Evening, Dec. 7, 1910, by the Rev. Z. L. Fash, M.A., B.D., Harold McCabe, Vancouver, and Ethel May Brehaut, Alexandra, P.E.I.

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Letter of Thanks! I. O. Foresters!

Eldon, September 20th, 1910.

Dear Mr. McPhee: - It is almost impossible for me to express my gratitude to you for your kindness in working for this grant for my children. It means a great deal to me, - more than you ever will know. I have always had cause to bless the Foresters' Order. The insurance has enabled me to keep my children with me, and the promptness with which it was forwarded to me helped me over some very difficult places at the time of my husband's sudden death.

This grant has come as a very welcome surprise. Please accept our hearth-felt thanks, Mr. McPhee, and may God bless the Independent Order of Foresters.

I am most sincerely yours,

Bertha West.

To Mr. George W. McPhee, Charlottetown:

This letter was received by Mr. McPhee from Mrs. West in receipt of a grant from the Orphan's Home Department of the I. O. F. for her children. Six years ago, she received $1000.00 mortuary benefit on her husband's life. The above shows that the I. O. F. does not forget the orphans even after the full insurance has been paid and those are only two of the benefits that the Order provides - all for the one rate.

E. J. Rattee

High Chief Ranger

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Death

George Turner, of Eldon, Belfast, died very suddenly on Sunday last of heart failure. Deceased was in his usual good health up to six o'clock in the afternoon of the day in which he died, and was sitting at tea when he was seized with a violent pain in the region of the heart and died inside of five minutes. The funeral will be held on Thursday afternoon next, Oct. 6th, from his late residence to St. John's Presbyterian Church Cemetery.

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Untitled

Neil McLeod, of Point Prim, received a telegram stating that his brother, Sam, died at Medical Lake, Washington, Oct. 13th. The remains left for his home at Point Prim on the 17th, and are expected to arrive at Charlottetown on Monday, 24th. The deceased was about 30 years old and left home about ten years ago. The sudden news of his death came as a great shock to his mother, brothers, and sisters.

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Marriage

FINDLAYSON-BALDERSTON - At Quincy, Mass., Nov. 30th, by the Rev. A. M. Thompson, Duncan Robert Findlayson, of Quincy, and Rhoda Balderston, both formerly of Prince Edward Island.

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Untitled

A very happy and merry party gathered at the home of David Jones, Pownal, to witness the marriage of his daughter, Melindo Eveline Jones to John Heber Gordon, of Brudenell, King's County. Promptly, at six o'clock to the strains of the wedding march, played by Mrs. Austin Judson of Alexandria, the bridal party appeared in the spacious parlor, and under a canopy of evergreens and flowers were united in marriage by the Rev. H. W. Too?? Of St. David's United Church, Georgetown. The bride was elegantly attired in white embroidered silk and wore the customary bridal veil and orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of white crysanthemums and maiden fern. Miss Annie Gordon, sister of the groom, accompanied the bride, and was tastefully and beautifully dressed in crepe silk poplin trimmed with silk applique, jet fringe and pale blue ribbons. After the event of the evening having been performed and the customary good wishes extended by a large number of relatives and invited guests, the party sat down to a sumptuous supper, to which full justice was done. The remainder of the evening was pleasantly spent in a special intercourse of a varied nature [J ] Mr. And Mrs. Gordon received an unusually large and select number of wedding gifts, testifying to the esteem and regard in which they are held by their varied friends.

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News from Garfield

A correspondent from Garfield writes that all of the people of that settlement are nearly all through digging their potatoes and the crop is only a light one this year. M. W. Gillis, Vancouver, B.C., is visiting his old home in Garfield. His many friends were all pleased to see him. Mr. Gillis left the Island twenty six years ago for the West and sees many changes on the Island. John A. McKenzie has sold his trotting horse, Wallie M., to Daniel Falconer for a handsome sum. Junnie McLeod of the S. S. Northumberland is visiting in Garfield, the guest of Daniel McDonald. Donald McKenzie, Melville, paid Garfield a visit last week. While there, he was the guest of Charles McEachern. Joseph Shaw is busy getting his fall ploughing done. Laughlie LcLean and son are busy working with their new stumping machine.

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Married

McLEAN-McDOUGALL - at the home of the bride, Orwell Cove, on Nov. 30th, 1910, by the Rev. J. W. McKenzie, Katie McLean, daughter of James McLean to Hermon McDougall, Newtown.

McLeod-McEachern - on the 6th inst., at the residence of Finlay McEachern, Newtown, J. W. McKenzie officiating, Miss Georgie McEachern to Murdock E. McLeod, Uigg.

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Sad Fatality

A sad fatality occurred at Iona a couple of days ago by which the two year old child of Benjamin Welsh, section foreman, was burned to death. Mr. Welsh was away from home attending to his work at the time, and Mrs. Welsh had gone to attend to the cattle, leaving the two children sitting by the wood stove. Spark from a burning ember, it seems, flew out from the stove and set fire to the little one's dress and in a few minutes, she was engulfed in flames. John McCabe and Owen Hughes who happened to be passing the house saw the flames and heard the child's cries. They quickly ran in and quenched the flames which engulfed the little one. The rescue, however, did not come in time to save the child's life, for she lingered in great agony till the evening, when despite all that could be done, her spirit passed away. Mr. And Mrs. Welsh have the sympathy of the community in their sad bereavement.

 

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Marriage

The marriage took place in the Pownal Methodist Church on Thanksgiving Day at 5 p. m. of Miss Linda Smith, daughter of John Smith, Pownal , to J. Harry Irving, of Lethbrdge, Alta. The bride, who wore a dainty gown of cream silk was attended by Miss Sadie Smith of Charlottetown. The groomsman was Maj. J. M. Jones and the officiating clergyman was Rev. E. E. Styles. Among the many presents received was a silver tea service from the choir and congregation of Pownal Church. Mr. and Mrs. Irving left yesterday morning for Lethbridge, Alberta.

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Ocean View News

An Ocean View correspondent writes: - Among recent visitors to this road was Duncan Nicholson, Iris. James McCallum has sold his valuable trotting mare, for which he received a handsome sum. James P. McLeod paid a flying visit to Eldon recently, the guest of Dan Dixon. Angus McMillan, school teacher, has purchased a brand new buggy and harness from Thomas McKenzie, Garfield. Angus M. McLeod is the owner of a horse that shows great speed. He intends making it interesting for the boys this winter. Sandy McLeod is the owner of a litter of beautiful York pigs. Murdock McLeod, Gaelic singer, is busily engaged in butchering this fall. John A. Ross has finished his ploughing of seventy five acres. What might have proved a very serious accident occurred to James McLeod on Sunday morning. While returning home from the brook his valuable mare, Winnie, stumbled and fell, throwing Mr. McLeod with full force to the ground. He escaped with only a few slight bruises, while the mare was somewhat weakened by the fall.

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McCabe-Burhoe Wedding Bells

 

At Alexandra on Wednesday evening, December 7, in the Baptist Church, Ethel May, youngest daughter of Theophilus and Mrs. Burhoe, was married to J. Harold McCabe, Vancouver, B.C. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Z. L. Flash, M.A., B.D., Charlottetown. The church was most beautifully decorated for the occasion, the happy couple being weeded under a large arch of white carnations, from which was suspended a bell of white roses. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a handsome gown of cream payette silk with silver trimmings, and veil caught up with orange blossoms. She carried a bouquet of bride's white roses and lilies of the valley.The bride was attended by her little niece, Lena C. McLure, Charlottetown, who made a very pretty maid of honour in her gown of blue silk, carrying a bouquet of pink carnations and white lilies of the valley with blue ribbon streamers. The wedding march was beautifully rendered by Mrs. Austin Judson. After the ceremony, the immediate relatives, with the bride and groom partook of a sumptuous wedding supper prepared by Mrs. Burhoe, and the evening was most pleasantly spent, the usual chivairie boys making the best of their bells, horns, tin pans, etc. The bride, who has been very popular, has been the recipient of many valuable present [sic], including a silver fruit basket from the choir and members of the Alexandria Church, where she had been the valued and esteemed organist, also a silver service and tray with monogram from Chester and Mrs. McLure, Charlottetown. The groom's present to the bride was a black fur pony coat with ermine trimmings, and to the maid of honour, a gold locket. The happy couple left Thursday morning for Boston, New York and Philadelphia. They will spend the winter in Los Angeles, Southern California. In March, they will take up their home in Vancouver, B.C., where the groom has been very successful in the Real Estate business, owning very valuable property in Vancouver, Seattle, and Los Angeles. Their many friends will join with the Guardian in wishing them all happiness.

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Married

McRAE-MORRISON - At the home of the bride, on the 18th inst., Alexander Sinclair McRae to Diana Morrison, both of Belfast. Rev. J. W. McKenzie officiating.

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Untitled Marriage Notice

The home of Jas. McLean, Orwell Cove, was the scene of a happy event on Wednesday night, Nov. 30th, when his second daughter, Miss Katie, was united in the holy bonds of matrimony with Herman McDougall of Newtown.. Miss Edith MacDougall, sister of the groom, supported the bride, while Wilfred McLean, brother of the bride, supported the groom. At exactly six o'clock, the contracting parties entered the parlour to the strains of the wedding march which was played by Miss Winnie MacDougall, sister of the groom. The bride looked charming in a cream dress and carried a bouquet of roses and maiden hair ferns. The ceremony was performed by Rev. J. W. McKenzie of Belfast in the presence of about 75 immediate friends and relatives. After supper had been served, and to which everybody did ample justice, the night was most pleasantly spent in dancing, singing, etc. The violin music was furnished by Dan McLeod and Jos. Griffin, and the bagpipes were played by Norman Gillis and added very much to the enjoyment of the evening. The esteem in which the young couple were held, was evidenced by the many beautiful and costly presents, too numerous, almost to mention. After everybody had expressed their thanks for the pleasant time spent, and wishing Mr. and Mrs. MacDougall success and happiness in their future career, the happy gathering came to an end. The Guardian joins with their many friends in wishing them a long, happy, and prosperous life.

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Untitled Marriage Notice

Quiet wedding took place at the residence of Finlay and Mrs. McEachern, Newton, on Tuesday evening, Dec. 6th, when their daughter, Georgie, was united in marriage to M. E. McLeod, one of the most prosperous farmers of Uigg. Rev. J. W. McKenzie, of Belfast performed the ceremony. Both bride and groom are both well and favourably known, Mr. McLeod being a brother of Judge McLeod, Summerside.

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Birth Notice

CRAWFORD - At Hunter River, to Dr. McN. and Mrs. Crawford, a daughter.

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A Provincialist's Generosity

When the little ones of some 25 north end families crept out of bed early this morning, and ran to take a peep into their stockings, they found them well filled. Their kind Santa Clause was a woman, and the gifts that filled their stockings and the Christmas dinners which these families will enjoy were sent by Mrs. M. A. Tennyson of 106 Huntington Ave.

She provided Christmas cheer for others, too, and this afternoon from 1 until later in the day passers by along Commercial St. are likely to see a steady stream on longshoremen heading for No. 276, where a feast will be enjoyed.

Mrs. Tennyson, was once a resident of the North End and is well known for her many charities. She spends a great deal of her time looking up the needy. For years now, she has given a Christmas feast to the men of the waterfront and it has become a sort of an institution. Longshoremen drifting to other ports have told of the good things that await every waterfront man at 276 Commercial St., Boston, on Christmas day and there are always many to enjoy it.

This year, Mrs. Tennyson conceived the idea of making a number of the poorer families of the district partakers of her distribution of holiday joy. With big baskets of eatables, toys, and envelopes containing money, she personally made visits to homes throughout the district.

Her efforts were not directed solely to the North End. She has sought to aid any unfortunates that she heard of. She helped, too, several churches and organizations of the District. - Boston Globe, Dec. 25th

(Mrs. Tennyson is a native of Newton, Belfast, and was Miss Annie Griffin, before her marriage, being the daughter of Dennis Griffin, and a sister of Capt. Philip Griffin of Charlottetown. Mrs. Tennyson is a very wealthy widow and every Christmas for some years past, she has given a dinner to the poor of the North End. She has also sent diner to prisoners in Charlestown jail [?]. Mrs. Tennyson visited Charlottetown last summer, and will return next year also. She is a lady of great business ability and by her own efforts has accumulated considerable property in Boston. For a number of years, she has been conducting lodging houses in the Hub. About six years ago, she retired with a large fortune, and now has a big income arising from real estate and other investments. She left the Island thirty years ago a poor girl and has been residing in Boston ever since.)

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Died

McRae - At Pinette, Feb. 2, 1911, Annie McRae, in the 63rd year of her age.

McRae - At Pt. Prim, on Feb. 20, 1911, Mrs. Archibald McRae, aged 84 years.

McAulay - At Belfast, Feb. 20th, after a lingering illness, Angus A. McAulay, in the 29th year of his age.

 

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Wedding

On Wednesday, January 18th, the home of Chas. A. Morrison, Roseberry, was the scene of a very pretty event, when his sister, Diana and A. Sinclair McRae were united in marriage. Rev. J. W. McKenzie officiated. The bride was attended by her sister, Belle, while J. D. McRae supported the groom. The nuptial ceremonies were performed in the presence of about sixty guests. After the ceremonies a pleasant evening was spent in the participation of vocal and instrumental music, dancing, and other amusements. The large number of presents, elegant and useful, which were received showed the high esteem in which the young people are held by their many friends.

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Mrs. Sage and Miss Helen Gould Greet Rev. M. J. McLeod

New York, March 4 - Affirming that he had no new message but only the old story of the gospel to tell, the Rev. Malcolm James McLeod Sunday evening preached his first sermon in the Collegiate Reformed Church of St. Nicholas, Fifth Avenue and Forty Eight street. About one thousand persons were present, and among the attentive listeners were the Mrs. Russel Sage, Miss Helen Miller, and the latter's companion, Mrs. Shaw, all of whom were parisioners there.

Mrs. Sage had not been in church for more than a year. She gave word that she would attend to welcome the new pastor, and she wished to have her pew reserved. She then requested that if Miss Gould arrived first she was to be seated in the Sage pew. Miss Gould did come, and she sat beside Mrs. Sage, who was long her Sunday School teacher.

"It is a great privilege to stand in a historic pulpit," said the Rev. McLeod in his sermon, "and I am deeply solicitous for its prestige. I can do nothing without your faith and prayers. If we preach the riches of culture, we are competing with the college, and the college has the advantage. If we preach the riches of literature we are coping with the magazines, and the magazines can beat us. Bit if we preach the riches of Jesus we have no rivalry. It is a great, holy, blessed wonderful monopoly. The preacher's message covers the whole stretch of human life."

The Rev. Mr. McLeod who succeeds the late Rev. Donald Sage Mackay after a lapse of almost two years, arrived Saturday evening with Mrs. McLeod, from Pasedena, Cal., where he was pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. They were stopping temporarily at the Belmont. The new minister will be installed next Sunday afternoon. (The above is from the New York Herald of May 2nd last and the article was supplemented by an excellent photo of the talented preacher, who is a native of this province and a brother of Mrs. (Dr.) H. D. Johnston, City.

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Untitled Death

The death of Captain Hugh McLean, Orwell, for many years a resident of Charlottetown, came as a shock to his many friends yesterday. He will be remembered as the captain of the Heather Bell, sailing between Crapaud, Orwell, East River, and Charlottetown. Captain McLean was a native of Charlottetown. After the loss of the Heather Bell, he became Captain of the Jacques Cartier, and later on the ferry service here. He was an excellent mariner and had a host of acquaintances, who will learn with sorrow of his demise. Captain McLean was a man of excellent character and much respected. A widow, and one daughter, Mrs. Levi Ings, of Orwell Cove survive. To the bereaved, all tender most respectful sympathy. The remains will be brought to Charlottetown by train on Sunday by train, and the service will be held shortly after 3 p.m. in Zion Church, which the late Captain for many years attended. After the service the procession will reform and march to the station, thence by train to Sherwood Cemetery.

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More

McLean - At Orwell Cove, on May 13th, Capt. Hugh McLean, aged 74 years. Funeral by special train Sunday, the 15th inst. from the residence of his son in law, L. R. Ings, Orwell Cove, leaving the house at 1 o'clock p.m. Funeral service in Zion Church after arrival at 3 p.m. Interment in Sherwood Cemetery.

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Meleville Notes

A correspondent from Meleville writes: The farmers of this community are busy with their spring work. Some thick flurries of snow have made their appearance, but beautiful May is near at hand, which it is expected will bring some of the fair sex from Uncle Sam's domain - Katie McLean, Meleville, and Sarah McDonald, Flat River, spent a few days in the city. - Jack Balderston is engaged in building an up to date store. - W. Emery is doing a rushing business with his gasoline engine. - Christine McLeod has returned home from a pleasant visit to Culloden, guest of Nora McPherson. - Miss Etta McRae, Point Prim, is visiting friends in Meleville. - John M. McKenzie paid a flying visit to Garfield recently. - The Go preachers are still around making calls in the Wood Islands and Culloden. - "Tis the voice of the sluggard, I heard him complain, I can's see the comet, Tis the break of day." Com.

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Eldon Notes

A Correspondent from Eldon writes that the farmers of that community have commenced their spring work. William Wallace has left on a visit to Wood Islands. Donald W. McDonald lost a valuable dog a few days ago. William McWilliam is visiting at Pinette Mills, the guest of Samuel McDonald. John J. Shaw is training Andrew Dixon's Commodore colt which has all the points that go to make a futurity. James Ross, Garfield, has left for Boston. Miss Alice McWilliam is visiting in Pinette, the guest of a friend. Murdock McKenzie has finished his contract of building Lockie McLean's dwelling house.

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Untitled

Rev. McLean Sinclair at the last meeting of the Presbytery applied for leave to retire from the active ministry, which was granted. Rev. McLean Sinclair has been 40 years in the ministry and during that long time has had only two pastorates: one in Belfast, P.E.I., and one at the East River. He is a distinguished Gaelic Scholar. Rev. Mr. Sinclair is hale, hearty and vigorous yet and has apparently many years before him.

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Untitled

J. J. McDonald, Pinette, has received a gasoline engine which was shipped him from Baltimore by Hector C. McRae. The engine which is 2 1/2 H. P. is one of the class called, "The Eagle Machine" and is a novelty here in this line of engine. Mr. McDonald will use the engine in connection with lobster fishing. Mr. McRae referred to above is a son of Capt. Donald McRae of Pinette (Ponds) and is the manufacturer of the "Champion" accumulator in Baltimore, Maryland, and thought still quite a young man, does a large business in that line, and has met with universal success of which his many friends will [article cut off here]

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Untitled

Rev. M. J. McLeod, New York, formerly of Eldon, and a brother of Mrs. (Dr.) H. D. Johnston, City, arrived in the city Monday evening on a visit to relatives in the province. He was accompanied by his little son and left yesterday afternoon for Eldon.

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Untitled

Lemuel and Mrs. Kennedy, Murray Harbour, leave Monday morning on the Northumberland for Strasbourg, Sask.

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Untitled

Among those who did an active part in welcoming our Late King, when he, as Prince of Wales, visited out city, half a century ago, was James St. C. Moore, now of Eldon, then one of the Charlottetown boys. He, being one of the military boys, firing the Royal Salute, which heralded the arrival of His Royal Highness to this Island Capitol, a memorable event - Mr. Moore was also one of the Guards of Honour, during the reception at Government House. Theophaleus Moore, of the In??? Revenue Dept. in this city is another who cherished the memory of that event. And probably a few more of the citizens there are, living today, who recall services rendered fifty years ago, to one of the youngest and best sovereigns who ruled over the vast empire.

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Married

At Pownal, P.E.I., Oct 22nd, by Rev. J. C. Spurr, Charles Frederick Panting of Eldon, top Mary Ann Martin of Pinette Bridge.

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Birth

McPherson - At Newton Cross, Nov. 19th, 1906, the Neil G. and Mrs. McPherson, a daughter.

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The Late Mrs. Percy Mutch

It is with profound regret that we have to chronicle the death of Mrs. Percy Mutch, which occurred at her home in Lot 48 on Saturday 29th ult. [Jan. 29, 1910] Mrs. Mutch was born at N. Rustico, where her father, William Toombs still lives, 36 years ago. In 1899 she married Percy Mutch, and settled in the old homestead in Lot 48. About four years ago, she became ill and underwent a serious operation in the Charlottetown Hospital, a second operation becoming necessary not long afterward. For a time she seemed to rally and her friends entertained hopes of her eventual recovery. Indeed, both she and they clung to such hopes almost to the end, and it was only comparatively recently that they understood that she could not possibly get well. During her long and painful illness she bore her sufferings bravely and patiently, taking an interest in things - her home, her friends, her church, until within a few days of her death. Although the end was not unanticipated, the news of her death came as a great shock., not only to those who were dearest to her, but to a very wide circle of friends.

The funeral took place on Monday, Jan. 29th. The service was conducted in the house by her pastor, Rev. E. E. Styles, assisted by Rev. D. McLean, a long time neighbour, and an intimate friend of the family.

Mr. Styles said he knew of no more appropriate passage from which to speak than St. Paul's words, " For me to live is Christ, and to die is gain." He had frequently visited her during the past few months, and if his visits had helped her they had been equally helpful to himself.

Mr. McLean spoke of his long and intimate acquaintance with the deceased, and when he visited her during her illness, the testimony was always one of resignation to the Divine Will and confidence in the Divine Love. He spoke feelingly to the children, encouraging them in the thought that their mother was now better off in that land where "God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any pain."

A few days before her death, Mrs. Mutch had selected the hymns for the service - "Safe in the arms of Jesus", "Rock of Ages", "Abide with me", and, "I heard the voice of Jesus say." The last she had requested her pastor to sing as a solo. She has also asked if six of her brothers would act as pall-bearers. They were, Rev. Herbert Toombs, Georgetown; George H., Charlottetown; William, New London; and Wallace, Hammond, and Lorenzo, living at Rustico. The remaining brother, Dr. Toombs of Mt. Stewart, had to leave before the service closed to attend a serious case. Besides these seven brothers, she leaves two sisters, Mrs. George McKenzie, Mt. Herbert, and Mrs. Lemuel Arthur, San Francisco. She also leaves three children, the oldest, Wendell, being 9 years, and Mildred and Elsie. She was interred in the Methodist burying ground in Mt. Herbert.

Mrs. Mutch will be greatly missed. Only those who were most closely acquainted with her knew the far-reaching influence issuing from her sick-room. In our expressing our deep sympathy, the Guardian is but voicing the universal feeling of the community.

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Untitled Wedding

The wedding of Miss Lizzie Lyons, one of Iona's most popular young ladies to James D. McKenna, a prosperous young farmer also of Iona, took place at St. Michael's Church on Tuesday morning, Oct. 5th, Rev. J. Gaudet officiating. The groom was supported by his brother, P. J. McKenna, while Miss Annie Lyons, sister of the bride, acted as Bridesmaid. After the ceremony, the bridal party, accompanied by a number of their friends, drove through the surrounding country returning about noon to the home of the bride's parents where diner was sumptuously served by Miss Catherine Lyons, sister of the bride. In the evening, a large number of invited guests assembled, and the tripping of the light fantastic was indulged in until the arrival of the "wee sma' hours." The bride was the recipient of many beautiful and costly wedding gifts which showed the esteem in which the young couple are held.

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Public Monuments on Prince Edward Island

In this province, where so many live to a good old age, a half a century will not seem a long way back.

In July the 20th, 1858, a little over fifty years ago, the James Gibbs, one of the last emigrant ships from Uigg, Scotland, arrived in Charlottetown. About 400 passengers were on board, tax of two dollars each had to be paid for each person before landing. We are told these brave settlers had to tend with landlords for several years, but pluck and perseverance overcame many obstacles in a new country.

There are only two couples living today who were married in Scotland. They came over on that eventful voyage of the James Gibbs. Angus McDonald and wife, live in Brooklyn, P.E.I.. Mr. McDonald's mother, who came over on the same ship only died five years ago at the great age of 103 years.

Alexander and Mrs. McLure who live at Breadalbane, P.E.I., are still hale and hearty and look as though they might live for many years to come. The descendants of the 400 who came over on the James Gibbs, are many, composed of comfortable farmers, business, and professional men.

We now go back to over a hundred years ago to August, 1803, when one of Lord Selkirk's ships the Polly arrived near Orwell, with a large number of Highlanders and Lowlanders, with their families, coming from different parts of Scotland.

The ships Dyke and Otter [Dykes & Oughton] followed shortly after, and the majority of the passengers settled near Belfast, Orwell, and Flat River. In case these lines may be read by those who may not have seen this section of Prince Edward Island would say, each place has a peculiar charm of its own, the inhabitants are prosperous and happy. Nature, however, has been particularly kind to Belfast and Eldon (that is to say, in the writer's opinion) and the sea scapes, landscapes, and forest scenes are things of beauty and we trust, a joy forever. We herewith give you a view of the Historical Presbyterian Church at Belfast, which, by the way, we touched upon in an article some time ago.

Outside the church ground, and surrounded in part by a beautiful natural grove of trees, stands a granite monument to the memory of the brave men, women, and children, who came to Prince Edward Island in 1903.

The monument was erected by public subscription amounting to $475.00. Four hundred and seventy five dollars.

The inscription reads as follows:

"In memory of the Scottish Emigrants who came to this Island by Lord Selkirk's ships, the Polly, the Dyke, and Oughton, and made homes for themselves and their children in the woods of Belfast."

The Hundredth anniversary in 1903, of the arrival of these brave people, was celebrated by a very large number of the descendants, by the unveiling of the above monument. The next article will illustrate, and touch upon the monument erected to Francis Bain, Geologist, Queen Square, Charlottetown.

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Island Casualties

Killed in Action:
MacWilliams, Neil Ross, L. Cpl., Thomas MacWilliams (father), Belfast.

Died of Wounds:
Mahar, James Maurice, Pte., Mrs. Catherine Mahar (mother), Charlottetown.
Harris, Edward Basil, Pte. Mrs. Elizabeth S. Harris, (wife), Alberton.
MacPhee, Charles Adolphus, Pte., Mrs. Mary McPhee, (mother), Summerside.

Wounded:
Arsenault, Joseph Leo, Gnr., Mrs. Alice Arsenault, (mother), St. Nicholas.
MacDonald, William Valentine, Pte. Mrs. Julia MacDonald, Bristol.

Slightly Wounded:
Sinclair, Donald William, Cpl., Mrs. Anna Sinclair, Charlottetown.

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Died

At Pinette, on September 6th, Donald A. Buchanan, aged 77 years. He leaves to mourn a wife and one son.

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Married

STEWART-EMERY - At Charlottetown, on Feb. 9, 1910, by Rev. H. E. Thomas, Alexander A. Stewart of Commercial Cross, to Agnes Ethel Emery, of Belle River.

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Death

Miss Margaret McEachern died suddenly on Saturday afternoon at the home of her sister, Mrs. Jesse M. Main, with whom she resided. She was born at Montague, P.E.I., and had only returned from visiting her relatives there a couple of weeks ago. Although she had been ailing for some weeks yet, her death was unlooked for, as she seemed better of late. She was an estimable and lovable lady who readily made friends. She is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Jesse M. Main of Lanesville, Mrs. Robert W. Stewart of Prince Edward Island, and Miss Emmeline McEachern of Winchester, and other relatives. A funeral service was held yesterday at the family residence, at which the Rev. Dr. Tarr officiated. Many neighbours and out of town relatives attended: James and Mrs. Johnstone and Miss Margaret Panting of Winchester, Misses Ethel and Mina McEachern of Somerville, Mrs. Johnson and Miss Ethel Grant of Mattapan, and Miss MacDonald of Dorchester. The remains will leave here today, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Main for Prince Edward Island., where the interment will be made. Funeral Services will be held according to expectations on Thursday, at the home of her sister, Mrs. Robert W. Stewart - Gloucester Times

The remains arrived at the home of her sister on Thursday, accompanied by her two sisters, Mrs. Jessie M. Main and husband, of Mainsville, Mass., and Miss Emmeline and Charles Quint. The funeral took place Friday afternoon and was largely attended. Interment took place at the Union Road Cemetery. Rev. David Wright of Montague conducted the funeral services. The pall-bearers were: Charles Quint, R. W. Stewart, Frank Panton, Jesse Main.

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News from Newton Cross

A correspondent from Newton Cross writes: M. G. Anderson has installed the roller process in his mill and is giving good satisfaction to his many customers under the careful management of Robert Cook. Norman Nicholson has imported from Ontario a thorough bred Shropshire ram. Mr. Nicholson is to be congratulated for his up-to-date stock raising. John MacPherson is the owner of a promising young filly named Commodore, which is likely to be heard of in the near future. Joseph Power, the capable and obliging milk hauler has completed his contract this fall. His many friends hope to see him on the route next summer. N. G. McPherson is doing a rushing business at the blacksmith trade. Brincely Coady has arrived home from British Columbia after an absence of ten years. His many friends will be glad to see him among them once more. Roderick McPherson has returned home after visiting friends in Charlottetown and vicinity. He brought with him a young water spaniel, which when trained, will be a big help to him during the sporting season. G. McPherson is making extensive repairs to his out buildings. The work is being performed by D. J. McTavish and A. H. McDougald. D. F. Smith threshed for A. J. Nicholson, Orwell Cove, sixty bushels of oats in twenty-two minutes. Beat this if you can. James Roach lost a valuable mare last week from colic. Joseph Griffin has sold his trotting mare, Nellie G. for a handsome sum.

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Eldon Notes

The farmers of this community are very busy putting in their crops. We are glad to hear that Miss Anetta McDonald is improving under the skilful treatment of Dr. J. F. Martin. Quite a number of our young boys and girls spent their vacation in Ocean View at the home of Mr. John Bruce, Postmaster of that place. We were glad to hear that Mr. J. T. McWilliam is slightly improved in health. Mr. Robert Stewart has returned home after visiting in Murray River and Milltown Cross. Mr. Norman McEachern has sold his valuable horse to Mr. Neil McLeod for a handsome sum.

SNOWBALL

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Death

The death occurred at North Belgrade, Maine, on April the first after a lingering illness of Jane Elizabeth, wife of Albert B. Staples and eldest daughter of the late Richard Robertson, Eldon, Belfast, in the 34th year of her age. She leaves a husband and three small children, four brothers, and two sisters to mourn her loss.

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Wedding

A very pretty wedding took place at the Queen City Hotel, City, on Feb. 23rd when Miss Bessie Stewart, daughter of Rev. Mr. Stewart, Valleyfield was united in marriage to Dr. Crawford, of Hunter River. The ceremony was conducted by the bride's father. The bride looked exceedingly pretty, dressed in a Princess gown of taupe broadcloth and was attended by her sister, Miss Mary Stewart, while the groom was supported by his brother, William Crawford, Wood Islands. After the ceremony, Dr. and Mrs. Crawford, accompanied by several of the guests, left on the western train for their beautiful new home at Hunter River, carrying with them the good wishes of their many friends.

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Wedding

On Wednesday evening, Oct. 28th, the home of John McRae of Wheatly River was the scene of a very pretty wedding, when his daughter, Mary Ann was joined in Holy wedlock to William Kennedy, of Point Prim. Rev. George Millar performed the ceremony in the presence of upward of forty invited guests. The parlor was nicely decorated for the occasion. Miss Jessie E. McRae, sister of the bride acted as bridesmaid, while Malcolm A. McLeod of Pinette supported the groom. The bride was given away by her brother, William McRae and was attired in cream coloured silk with trimmings of applique and ribbon. The bridesmaid wore white organdy with lace and ribbon trimmings. The wedding march was played by Mrs. William McRae. Following the usual congratulations an elegant and well-appointed supper was served, after which music and games were indulged in. When the clock had for some time told the dawning of another day, the guests departed all wishing Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy a happy and prosperous journey through life. The next day accompanied by a few of their friends and amidst showers of old shoes, the happy couple drove to their home in Point Prim.

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Death

The death took place at Port Wood on Tuesday, the 7th inst, at two o'clock p.m. of Laura Jane, beloved wife of Daniel A. Simons, and daughter of Daniel Keenan of that place. Deceased was in the twenty first year and was beloved by all who knew her. She leaves to mourn an infant daughter, only two days old, a sorrowing father and mother, and three brothers, Augustus, Clifford, and Milburn at home, and two sisters, Mrs. David Blake of Charlottetown, and Myrtle at home. The funeral took place on Thursday to Little Sands Cemetery. Rev. Mr. Hogan of Murray River spoke very acceptably from the words, "You will be missed because your seat will be empty."

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In Memoriam

In loving memory of our dear mother, Mrs. D. A. Nicholson of Kinlock, who departed this life on Feb. 22nd, 1909. One tear has passed, we miss her more. Her memory fresh, our hearts still sore. Her welcome smile, her loving face, no more can we fill her vacant place, we loved her then, we love her still.

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Birth

CARRIER - On May 12th, 1910, to John E. and Mrs. Carrier of Earnscliffe, a daughter.

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Deaths

CARRIER - On Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1911 at Earnscliffe, Stephen Carrier, aged 77 years.

MacWILLIAMS - At North Winsloe Aug. 14, 1911, Mrs. Samuel MacWilliams, aged 70 years. Funeral today, Aug. 15th, at ? o'clock from the residence of her daughter, Mrs. John Nunn, North Winsloe to Milton Cemetery.

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Married

MCRAE-COMPTON - At Queen Hotel, Charlottetown, on the 18th Angus McRae and Margaret Compton both of Belfast, Rev. J. W. McKenzie officiating.

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Wedding

The marriage of Miss Christie Gillis, daughter of John and Mrs. Gillis of Flat River, to John A. Clark of Quincy, Mass., was solemnized at the home of the bride's parents by Rev. S. D. McPhee on the afternoon of the 20th July, in the presence of a number of invited guests. Miss Mary Gillis, sister of the bride was bridesmaid, while John Ernest McLeod of Vernon River, supported the groom. The afternoon was pleasantly spent with music both vocal and instrumental, the instrumental being played by the veteran violin player, C. C. Morrison. The large number of valuable and useful presents testified to the popularity of the contracting parties. At 6 o'clock the happy couple left for Charlottetown, amid showers of rice and good wishes.

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Death of Capt. Archibald Finlayson

On Wednesday morning the sixteenth of March, there peacefully passed away the oldest resident of Point Prim in the person of Captain Archibald Finlayson who was in the eighty-fifth year of his age. Mr. Finlayson was a man who had much experience. He had sailed with the late Admiral Bayfield on the old Gulnare when she was but a topsail schooner. After which, he sailed on the Margaretta Stevenson, also in the surveying service. Later, he took the position of Pilot on the Princess of Wales, and leaving this ship after a long and faithful service of upwards of twenty years, he took the position of pilot on the old winter steamer, "Northern Light", and afterwards on the S. S. Stanley, then plying between Pictou, Georgetown, and Charlottetown. It is not to be forgotten that the deceased Captain was sent by the late Captain Orlebar to pilot the Royal squadron into Charlottetown harbour with His Majesty the King on board, then Prince of Wales in the year 1860. The late Captain Finlayson was a man of tender affections and good nature. He leaves to mourn a sorrowing widow, two daughters, and one son. The daughters who are left to mourn the loss of a kind and affectionate father are: Mrs. Neil Gillis of Orwell, Mrs. Capt. John McPherson of Charlottetown, and one son, William, who is on the old homestead. The funeral will take place on Friday, the 18th of March from his residence to the Mt. Buchanan Cemetery.

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Death

There passed away at her home in Eldon, on Tuesday, Marhc 22nd, after but a few hours illness. Maria M. aged thirty five, beloved wife of Peter Penny. She leaves to mourn, besides a sorrowing husband, one daughter Janie, aged nine, to whom the sympathy of many friends goes out, in their sudden and sad bereavement.

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News from Eldon

A correspondent from Eldon writes: Inventor McTavish is leaving in a few days for St. John. Norman McEachern is visting in Pinette. William Buchanan and son Eddie are engaged in shooting Moose. Miss Ruth Munroe is spending her Easter holidays at her home in Pinette. Readers will be sorry to hear that Donald W. McDonald is laid up with a sore eye, we hope soon to hear of his recovery. Miss Myrtle Ross, in the employ of A. M. Ross, Murray River, is spending the Easter holidays at her home in Pinette.

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More from Eldon

A correspondent from Eldon writes: John T. Weatherbie, Ocean View, paid Eldon a flying visit a few days ago. Simon Nicholson has sold a valuable cow, for which he received a handsome sum. Joseph Dixon is engaged in sawing lumber for P. Hogan. Donald W. McDonald left on the Murray Harbour train recently for Caledonia. Alex. McEachern is visting in Garfield, the guest of Donald W. McDonald. William McLeod, Garfield, has arrived home from the lumbering woods. Robert Stewart, mailman, is about finishing up on his contract of mail driving, having only a few trips more. We hope the next man will give as good service as Mr. Stewart.

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Newsy Notes From Newton Cross, P.E.I.

Newton Cross correspondent writes: James McKenna is busily engaged in hauling lumber with which he intends to erect a large barn 110 x 30 ft. Charles Gillis intends to enlarge his piggery. He is going into the hog raising business. His friends wish him success in his new undertaking. D. McTavish has recovered from his recent illness. His many friends will be glad to see him out again. Norman Nicholson has returned from Ottawa, bringing with him, some fine Leicester ewes. Mr. Nicholson is to be congratulated on his purchase. The roads have been kept in excellent condition, under the management of our overseer J. McPherson. He has been the best overseer in this vicinity in many years. R. Cook is doing a rushing business in the sawmill of M. G. Anderson. J. Dunn is about to build a large poultry house. Donald Gillis, assisted by Mr. O'Mera, and expert lumber man, has hauled to M. G. Anderson some of the finest pine which has been seen there for years. R. McPherson has imported a fine Holstein bull. D. McTavish and H. McDougall, contractors will be busily engaged in erecting various buildings throughout this vicinity during the summer.

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Munificent Gift To Orwell Church

Tuesday, the thirty-first day of August was a memorable day in the history of the Valleyfield Congregation. Precisely at ten o'clock, Dr. Macphail of Orwell, professor in McGill College, arrived at the new church now in the course of erection, with a magnificent bell which he presented to the congregation. The bell weighs nearly a ton and cost nearly a thousand dollars, and was paid for by Dr. Macphail together with the cost of erection and every incidental expense added thereto. Its tones can be heard for a distance of seven or eight miles. An address was presented to him on behalf of the congregation expressive of there [sic] thanks and gratitude for the splendid donation, to which the learned Doctor made a suitable and feeling reply. Though living the greatest part of his time in Montreal, in connection with McGill College, and editor of the University Magazine, still, he prides himself on being a Provincialist and had always taken a lively interest in the welfare of his native land. Men of this stamp are scarce and it is a pity that more of his standing and ability could not be induced to enter public life to represent people in the legislature here or in the House of Commons in Ottawa. He would certainly be straight in the legislature in standing up for the rights of a much neglected province.

On this magnificent bell is transcribed the following:

"Vocos vivo mortuos plango.
William Macphail, 1802-1852.
William Macphail, 1830-1905.
William Macphail 1859-1893".

When thinking it all over, one is reminded of the grand old patriotic hymn, one verse of which is as follows:

"Our Father's Sepulchures are here;
And there our kindred dwell
Our children, too, how could we love,
And love another land as well."

These inscriptions are appreciated when it is known that Dr. Macphail's grandfather has his resting place in the Cemetery at Valleyfield and no doubt for that and other reasons the Doctor placed this monument of his respect in the Church tower. Long may it toll and long may the Doctor live to remind him of his generous gift.

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Valleyfield

John McPherson, the noted horse-handler, has just finished moving the old Gospel tent at Valleyfield to the new church lot. The unanimous thanks of the managers of the congregation was tendered him for the successful manner in which he performed such a difficult undertaking. This building was erected twenty-four years ago by D. L. McKinnon, Montague, and was used to accommodate the large crowds which gathered at the communion and other services in the summer season. It is thirty-six feet square and the outside walls are eight feet high, and the center is supported by two rows of heavy posts. It is now to be used as stables for horses during divine service. The finishing touches are being applied to the new church. The workmanship, reflects great credit on the contractor, Jas. A. Martin. The pews are being installed by Mark Wright of Charlottetown, and are of the most modern design. The pulpit, which is of quarter oak, is manufactured by the same firm, and is presented to the congregation by the Mrs. Rev. R. McLean to be in memory of her late husband, who was the much loved pastor of this congregation for over twenty years. The gift is much appreciated by the many friends of Mrs. McLean in the community. The new church is the design of C. B. Chappell, architect, Charlottetown, and is built under his supervision assisted by Hugh McPherson and John McLeod as inspectors. The opening services were held on Sabbath, 26th. Morning service at 10:30, afternoon at 3 p.m., and evening at 7:30. The services of very popular clergymen were secured.

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Death

The death of David R. Stewart occurred suddenly at Hampshire on April 29, 1909, at the advanced age of 84 years. His parents came from Scotland on the Ship Polly and settled near Belfast, P.E.I. He was honest and upright in all his dealings and was respected by all his acquaintances and friends. He was of a quiet and contented nature, he asked for little but the comforts of home and with an assurance amongst the righteous he passed away. His remains were laid to rest in the Hampshire Cemetery. The funeral was conducted by the Rev. Hugh Millar and was largely attended. The pall-bearers were John Watts, Enoch Ackland, Albert Tremere, Neil Matheson, William Rodd, and John Pethick. A widow, five daughters and two sons survive him. - Mrs. Neil McNeill living at North River, Miss Ida M. living in Newtonville, Mass., Mrs. P. H. Crawford living in Winchester, Mass., James R. living in Charlottetown and Alice, Louise, and William living at home.

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Born

SIMMONS - At Wood Islands, East, Sept 5th to D. A. and Mrs. Simmons, a daughter.

MacKENZIE - On July 6th, to Dr. D. W. and Mrs. MacKenzie (nee Edith Moore), New York, a son.

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A Worthy Man Departs

The death of John Allan McDonald, of Uigg, after a short attack of pneumonia, occasioned with great sorrow to a very wide circle of friends and acquaintances. He was well and widely known and liked. He was a representative of the Frost and Wood Machinery Company and was very successful. He was also an zealous Orangeman, and sat in committee with his brethren, the lodgemen at Uigg, Monday evening, Dec. 6th, they expecting to meet him again in like manner on the 20th, but alas, on that date they arranged a special session to arrange funeral details. Deceased was 50 years old. Snow was steadily falling, covering the earth with a pall of spotless purity, and a great company of both sexes and all ages followed him to his last resting place in the burying ground of the "Big" church, Orwell Head. The officiating clergy were Rev. George Orman, of Vernon River and Grand Chaplain of the Orange Grand Lodge, Prince Edwards Island, and Rev. A. J. McNeill of Murray River, also a member of the Orange Association and a formal pastor of the church. His brethren of the Orange Association followed in goodly numbers, including the Master of the Lodge, Brother Campbell, the District Manager, Brother E. Percy Rowe and many other officials. All was reverently done. Every heart must go out to the bereaved wife. She is laid aside by that sorrowful complaint pneumonia, to which her husband succumbed. The pall-bearers were Comp. J. S. Martin, David Burt, W. M. McLean, L.O.L. 1843, A. A. J. McLeod, E. P. Rowe, M. H. Campbell, and A. J. Nicholson. The two young children and the following sisters and brothers survive. Mrs. John Annear, Montague, Mrs. Alex Bruce, Lyndale, Mrs. Jas. L. McDonald, Kinross, John McDonald, Lyndale. Lion L. O. L. No. 1909 has been called on to part with two respected members recently. About three months ago, an uncle of the deceased was buried. His two brothers are also members of this order.

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Married

SHEIDOW-McINTYRE - At the home of the bride, Montague, on the evening of the 15th inst., by the Rev. ?. A. Wightman, Miss Margaret E., daughter of Wm. And Mrs. McIntyre, "Hillcrest Farm," to Emmerson Sheidow of Mill View.

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Born

On June 29th to Mr. and Mrs John R. McWilliam, Eldon, a daughter.

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Untitled

James A. Nicholson, Orwell Cove, has returned from a trip to Ontario. Mr. Nicholson accompanied Rev. S. McPhee and family to their new home in Avonmore, Ont., and stayed with them until they were settled and till Mr. McPhee inducted to his new church. A hearty was given to the new minister, a reception being held after the induction, which was a most impressive one. Among the prominent ministers present were Rev. Mr. Beaton, who is well known in this Province, having preached at Eldon on different occasions, and who is a highly educated and eloquent speaker. Mr. McPhee has an elegant manse to live in, and his congregation in a village of about 500 people, are hospitable Scottish families who also speak the Gaelic tongue.

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Minister Refuses to Preach

The Rev. Malcolm James McLeod, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, of Pasadena, today declared he had not accepted a call to the Fifth Avenue Church, of New York, the wealthiest church in the United States. "I had an invitation to preach during my vacation," said Re. McLeod. "I am not like Frank Tallage, who did not preach, pray, or practice on his vacation. I practiced and prayed, but did not preach. I declined to preach, even to fashionable Fifth Avenue." Rev. McLeod has refused three invitations to accept a raise in salary during his tenure of the Pasadena pulpit. Pasadena Exc. Oct. 14.

Re. Dr. McLeod is the oldest son of D. A. McLeod, Eldon, and is said to be one of the ablest preachers on the Pacific Coast. He has a large number of friends in Charlottetown. Mrs. H. Johnson is a sister. The Guardian heartily congratulates the Doctor.

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Wedding

A very pretty wedding took place at the home of John and Mrs. Gillis, Flat River, on the 28th inst. When their daughter, Christina A. was married to John A. Clark of Quincy, Mass. The solemn ceremony was performed by the Rev. S. D. McPhee, in the presence of a large number of invited guests. Many beautiful and costly presents testified to the popularity of the bride and groom. Mary Gillis, sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid and Ernest McLeod supported the groom. Mr. and Mrs. Clark will spend their honeymoon visiting friends in this Province, before returning to their future home in Quincy, Mass.

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Death

The remains of Stewart McTavish, so foully murdered at Cambridge, Mass. were lovingly laid to rest in the family plot at St. John's Cemetery, Belfast, on the 28th Inst. The funeral service was conducted by the Rev. S. D. McPhee assisted by the Rev. McEwen of Iona. The exceptionally large concourse of people forming the sad funeral procession showed the high esteem in which the deceased was held in his native land and the deep sympathy felt for the sorrow-stricken parents and relatives. The scene in the home when the sad message came was heart-rending, and one never to be forgotten. He who promises "to wipe all tears form our eyes" is graciously sustaining the broken-hearted parents and family by sweet consolation of his Grace and presence. "Stewart" was a young man of exemplary character and a general favorite. His untimely and cruel death has cast a deep gloom over the whole Province. The bereaved parents and relatives have the prayers and deep sympathy of all.

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Marriage

At Belfast, Dec. 11th, by the Rev. A. Maclean Sinclair, John Buchanan of Mount Buchanan, to Rachel McLeod of Fairville.

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Eldon Notes

A correspondent from Eldon and Belfast says: The farmers of this vicinity are patiently awaiting more snow to get home their winter's wood - not even enough for the boys to snow-ball the cop. Herbert Martin has finished hauling his workshop. The work was performed by Jack McLellan and James Munroe. N. Larabee and E. Gay are doing a rushing business in the butchering. While N. A. Gillis and Thomas McLellan were returning from Vernon Station on the ice, the horse broke through off Casket Point, and only for the timely assistance of Neil D. Gillis, of Orwell Cove, they might have lost their horse. Jack McDougall is visiting friends in Newtown, the guest of James Grifin. A. McEachern is kept busy in his workshop supplying the wants of the farmers. D. A. McTavish's mare, which got hurt some time ago, is slowly improving. John Wheeler shot two foxes with his repeating rifle. M. Griffin is supplying Newtown School with wood this winter. J. Biggs butchered a hog, fifteen months old, which tipped the scale at six hundred and thirty pounds. Beat that who can. W. Smith and Joseph Griffin are busily engaged sawing wood with their circular saw, which they run with a gasoline engine. Their many friends wsh them success in their undertaking. H. McDougall shot an animal the other day that is supposed to be a wild-cat.

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Golden Wedding Celebration

Mr. and Mrs. John Bruce of Ocean View, celebrated their Golden Wedding at their home on Thursday last. Mr.. Bruce was born in Lyndale, P.E.I., on March 25th, 1834, Mrs. Bruce, nee Miss Mary Ross, was born at Grandview, March 20th, 1832, and their marriage took place on December 2nd, 1859. Although both have passed the three score and ten mark, they are enjoying fairly good health. They have a family of nine children, all of whom have inherited the sturdy constitution of their parents. Four sons are located in Seattle, including J. M. Bruce, who is the largest contractor in that city. His brothers in Seattle are: Daniel J., Alexander, and Angus M. The daughters are: Mrs. M. B. McFadyen, of Quincy, Mass. Mrs. Lou Wells, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, Mrs. E. L. Harrington, of Boston, Mrs. Herbert Wadman, of Boston, Mrs. John R. McWilliams, of Eldon, P.E.I., and Mrs. John Cairns, of Earnscliffe, P.E.I.

Mr. J. M. Bruce, who has been absent from his native Province for 23 years, came home to attend the anniversary celebration. His sisters, Mrs. Wadman, of Boston, who is now residing with her parents, Mrs. McWilliams, of Eldon, and Mrs. Cairns, of Earnscliffe, were the other members of the family present on the interesting occasion. The grandchildren, of which there are many, were represented by Miss Ethel Wadman, and Miss Margaret McWilliams.

The weather, unfortunately, was unfaithful, and all who were invited could not be present, but the following sat down to dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Bruce at Two o'clock Thursday afternoon. - Mr. J. M. Bruce, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Harrington, Mr. and Mrs. Alex McLeod, Mr. and Mrs. John Ross, Mr. and Mrs. Murdock McLean, Mr. and Mrs. John R. McWillaims, Mrs. William McWilliams, Miss Sadie McLeod, Miss Flora D. Buchanan, Miss Emma Buchanan, Miss Ethel Wadman, Miss Margaret McWIlliams, Mr. J. Alexander Ross, Mr. Duncan Buchanan, Mr. James McCallum, Mr. J. Robt. McWilliams, Mr. Donald McWilliams, Mr. Lawrence Kelly, and Miss Jessie Buchanan.

After the tast diner has been disposed of, an interesting program of toasts, etc. was taken up. Mr. John Ross, the toast master proposed in eloquent and touching terms the health of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce. It was responded to on behalf of the worthy couple by Mr. Donald McWilliams, a retired captialist formerly of British Columbia, but who is now residing in Ocean View. Mr. Murdock McLeod and Mr. Malcolm sang Gaelic songs in splendid style, Miss Ethel Wadman presiding at the piano. After several other solos had been rendered and instrumental music furnished, a period of delightful social intercourse followed and the happy event was brought to a close, the guests departing after wishing Mr. and Mrs. Bruce many more years of health and happiness, and expressing the hope that they could all be present at their diamond wedding.

During their half century of wedded life, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce had only one sorrow to mar their happiness, the loss of a little boy eight months old who was burned to death in their first house in Dundee. After the accident they left that part of the Island and removed to Ocean View where they now have a comfortable home, and where they now keep the Post Office.

On their wedding anniversary they were the recipients of seventy dollars in gold including a twenty dollar gold piece from their son, J. Alexander in Alaska. If their health will permit, they expect to take a trip next summer to Seattle where they will visit their sons.

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Married

At Columbus Ave. Church, Boston, on Dec. 18th, 1904, by the Rev. Scott Hershey, Wm. O. Nicholl of Hyde Park, Mass., and Florence Buchanan, of Mount Buchanan, P.E.I.

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Died

At Mount Buchanan, April 15th, Mabel F., infant daughter of James A. and Mary Stewart, aged two months.

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Died

At Stanford, Montana, Mabel, infant daughter of James A. and Maysie Stewart, formerly of Mt. Buchanan, aged six months. Suffer the little children to come unto me. For such is the Kingdom of God.

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Obituary

Catherine Ross, relict of the late Hugh McWilliams, died at Ocean View, Lot 58, on the third day of April, 1909, at the ripe age of eighty-three years. During the last four years, she had been greatly suffering in body by rheumatism and failing strength, succeeded by loss of eyesight, which sore affliction she always endured with that humble, patient and due resignation that show clear mark of the Christian mind and heart. In this neighbourhood, she had lived for over fifty years, beloved and highly esteemed by all, and the whole community mourns her loss as a woman in which all the virtues of industry, prudence, sociability, and amicable manners were closely combined to form an estimable character. Faithful as a friend, dutiful and tender hearted as a wife and mother, are moral qualities that may always be cherished in remembrance of her by all who had ever had the pleasure of her acquaintance. The deceased had been a devoted member of Belfast Church for many years, and in her time of affliction, her sole desire and humble prayer would be for more grace to seek and know the truth through the merits of Christ alone, in which blessed hope, she calmly fell asleep. Her funeral was largely attended, when Rev. S. D. McPhee ably and solemnly officiated on the occasion, giving a fine address in commendation of the departed one. Her husband and one son predeceased her over four years ago. Her surviving family are Donald, John R., and William at Ocean View, Alexander, and Mrs. J. T. McWilliams at Eldon.

Mrs. McWilliams was the second daughter of the late Donald Ross of Grandview. Her surviving sisters are Mrs. D. McDonald and Mrs. John Bruce and Mrs. M. Buchanan, of Ocean View; two brothers, Donald, in California, and John in Brantford, Ontario.

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Death

The death occurred in this city yesterday morning of Mrs. (Capt.) John McPherson, of Prince Street, the sad event taking place about ten o'clock. The news inexpressably shocked the great number of friends of the deceased and her family, and though, knowing Mrs. McPherson had been in delicate health of late, they were no prepared for the distressing announcement of her sudden death. When Mrs. McPherson arose in the morning she was not as well as usual and a doctor was summoned. She recovered somewhat from her supposedly temporary attack, but later she became unconscious and fell suddenly to the floor, death ensuing shortly after.

Mrs. McPherson is survived by her mother, Mrs. (Captain) James Murchison, who resided with Mrs. J. T. Lance, Prince Street; seven sisters- Mrs. D. Mcleod, Saskatchewan; Mrs. (Rev.) H. W. McEwen, Boise, Iowa; Mrs. N. Larrabee, Eldon; Mrs. J. T. Lance, and Mrs. J. F. Whear, City; Mrs. (Captain) McLeod, Buenos Ayres, S. A.; Mrs. J. Wilson, presently en route to Buenos Ayres and one brother, Captain J. Murchison, Buenos Ayres. Those of her family surviving are her bereaved husband, Captain McPherson of the C. G. S. Minto, three daughters, Mrs R. R. Clark, Vancouver; Miss Annie, of this city, who is presently visiting in Vancouver; and Miss Katie at home. Also two sons, J. D. McPherson, in California and Angus McPherson, Medicine Hat, Alta. Capt. McPherson will arrive home tonight on the Minto. To all the bereaved family, the Guardian expresses sympathy in their hour of trial.

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Funeral of the Late Capt. McLeod

The funeral of the late Captain Alexander McLeod, which took place Tuesday afternoon at Orwell Cemetery, was very largely attended. Services were conducted in the church by Rev. D. B. McLeod, who referred in fitting terms to the sad event, and paid eloquent tribute to the deceased. The pall-bearers were: Peter McQueen, Neil D. McLeod, Patrick Morrissey, Dougald C. McDonald, Norman Wood, and S. C. Gay. Among the floral tributes were roses from the officer and crew of the Constance, and Captain Taylor and officers of the Gulnaire. Flowers were also sent by Lieutenant-Governor McKinnon, Mr. and Mrs. Bonnell, Charlottetown, and the Misses McLeod, St. Avard's.

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Death

After a long illness, patiently born, there fell asleep at the home of his brother, Grand View, on Nov. 28th, Martin Martin. Jr., aged 55 years. The deceased was a son of a worthy elder, Alexander Martin. He has four sisters and six brothers, all of whom walked in the way of the father. "Some are with us yet, others have fallen asleep." The funeral services at the house and grave were conducted by a life long friend of the deceased, Rev. D. B. McLeod. Interment was at Orwell Head. He is survived by a widow and numerous friends and relatives, who will long cherish his memory. He died in full assurance of faith.

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Untitled

The moderator of the Glengarry Presbytery - Rev. N. H. McGillivary, Cornwall, presided in the induction of Rev. S. D. McPhee, B.A., to the charge of the Avonmore congregation. Rev. H. S. Lee, of Apple Hill addressed the minister. Rev. W. Bell, Finch, [?] the congregation, and Rev. R. W. Cliffe preached the induction sermon. In the evening a reception in honor of the new pastor was held. Rev. W. McGillivray presided, and good entertainment was provided. Addresses were given by Rev. W. D. Bell, Rev. L. Beaton, and Rev. Mr. McPhee. Rev. Mr. Bell, who had charge of the congregation during the vacancy, and Rev. L. Beaton, Moose Creek, who supported the call to Rev. Mr. McPhee before the Prince Edward Island Presbytery, were presented by purses, accompanied by appreciative addresses by the congregation. The address to Mr. Bell was read by Mr. Ward, and that to Mr. Beaton by W. J. McCann, M. P. P. The call to Mr. McPhee was a very harmonious one. The call to Mr. McPhee was a very harmonious one, and he enters upon his work with every promise of a true pastorate.

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Married

At the manse, Caledonia, 24th inst. By the Rev. John Sutherland, Angus J. McLeod to Margaret McDonald, both of Glen William, Lot 63, King's Co.

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Married

McWILLIAMS-FINCH - In this city, Tuesday, Nov. ? [date obliterated by tear in paper], by Rev. T. F. Fullerton, Samuel McWilliams to Ella Jane Finch, both of Charlottetown.

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Died

McLEOD - Suddenly, at Eldon, on July 28 ult., Annie McLeod, daughter of the late Roderick McLeod, aged 74 years.

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Birth

At Somerville, Mass., July 31, 1906, to Russel and Mrs. White, a son.

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Sudden Death of Mrs. Molyneaux

On the evening of the 15th inst., the community of Southport was saddened by hearing of the sudden death of Mrs. Nathaniel Molyneaux. A few weeks ago, Mrs. Molyneaux went to the P.E.I. Hospital where she underwent a serious operation, which was a perfect success. After the operation she improved rapidly and was intending to return to her home on the 16th, when on the evening before she took a fainting spell from which she never recovered but died in a few minutes. Mrs. Molyneaux was 51 years of age. She gave her heart to Christ when but a child, and united with the 2nd Baptist Church, Lawrence, Mass., January 18, 1882. Naturally, Mrs. Molyneaux was of a cheerful, generous, kind spirit, and thus, permeated as she was with the spirit of Christ made her one of the most noble specimens of Christian womanhood. She possessed the rare faculty of being able to cover the feelings of others with the mantle of charity and was ever delighted to speak and encouraging word or lend a helping hand to any one in need. Her place in the community and in all of the activities of the church will, indeed, be hard to fill. It was her joy to attend the services of the sanctuary and her pastor mourns the loss of an earnest worker and a most sympathetic and attentive hearer. She will be greatly missed in her home by her sorrowing husband who mourns the loss of one of the most devoted of wives. Beside the sorrowing husband, she leaves one brother and two sisters. Alex D. McPhee, of Earnscliffe; Mrs. R. McKinnon, of Pownal; Mrs. Phillip Irving of Cherry Valley, a large number of nephews and nieces, to whom she was like a mother, and a host of friends who will ever cherish the memory of her sainted life. The funeral service on the 17th was largely attended and exceedingly solemn, as all who had known her in life mourned the loss of a personal friend. The remains were taken to the Cross Roads Church where pastor, E. H. Erb, who conducted the service spoke appropriate words from Hebrews 4:9.

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Death

MOLYNEAUX - Suddenly at the P.E. I. Hospital, on Feb. 15th, 1910, Mrs. Nathaniel Molyneaux of Southport in the 51st year of her age. Funeral from her late residence on Thursday, at 2 p.m. to Cross Roads Cemetery.

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In Memoriam

In loving memory of Mrs. D. A. Nicholson, Kinlock, who departed this life on Feb. 22, 1909:

One year has passed, we miss her more.
Her memory fresh, our hearts still sore.
Her loving face and cheerful smile,
No one can fill her vacant place.

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Died

STAPLES - At North Belgrade, Maine, on April 1st, 1908, after a lingering illness, Jane Elizabeth, wife of Albert B. Staples and eldest daughter of Richard Robertson, Eldon, P.E.I.

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Marriage

MacWILLIAMS-CAMERON - At Watermere on Dec. 6 inst., by the Rev. D. McLean, Robert O. MacWilliams, Charlottetown, to Miss Annie Cameron of the same place.

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Died

At Pinette, On October 7th, Alex Hector McDonald, aged 20 years.

'Tis hard to break the tender cord
When love has bound the heart,
'Tis hard to speak the words,
"We must forever part."

Dearest, loved one we have laid thee
In peaceful grave's embrace,
But thy memory will be cherished
'Till we see thy heavenly face.

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